Coins from Canadian provinces

During the period 1794 to 1867, Great Britain's foreign policy was to maintain rigid control of the British North American colonies. Colonies were to produce the raw materials needed by the homeland and to pay for imported goods in what the mother country considered legal tender. As the local colonial economies grew the need for circulating coinage became quite acute because they were constantly short of legal tender coins. Consequently the colonists resorted to their own ingenuity and produced many local tokens from many sources, including counterfeits.
Wikidata: Q2879

See also: Canada, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Upper Canada, New Brunswick, United Province of Canada, British Columbia, Alberta, Newfoundland, New France

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Canada › Canadian provinces • Pound

½ Penny (Tiffin Token - Imitation - George III/Commerce)
1820

Token: Blacksmith tokens
Brass • 4.9 g • ⌀ 27.2 mm
CCT# BL-32, Breton His# 1008, N# 144826
½ Penny (Tiffin Token - Imitation - George III/Commerce)
1820

Token: Blacksmith tokens
Copper • 4.2 g • ⌀ 26.0 mm
CCT# BL-33, N# 144830
½ Penny (Bust & Harp - Imitation)
1820

Token: Blacksmith tokens
Copper • 7.5 g • ⌀ 26.7 mm
CCT# BL-36, N# 144837
Available for swap ½ Penny (Pure copper preferable to paper)
(1820-1830)

Token: Pre-confederation tokens
Copper • 6.7 g • ⌀ 27.7 mm
Breton His# 1009, CCT# AM- 4, N# 73190
½ Penny (North American Token)
(1825)

Token: Blacksmith tokens
Copper • 7.5 g • ⌀ 27.6 mm
CCT# AM-5A, Breton His# 1013, N# 161165
½ Penny (Regal Imitation - George III left)
(1835)

Token: Blacksmith tokens
Copper • 7.3 g • ⌀ 27.0 mm
CCT# BL-1, N# 104157