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20 Stüber Siege currency

Features

Country City of Jülich
(German states)
Type Standard circulation coin
Year 1621
Value 20 Stüber (20)
Currency Stüber
Composition Silver
Weight 8.88 g
Diameter 36 mm
Shape Round
Demonetized Yes
References KM# 50,
  • Tracy L. Schmidt (editor); 2019. Standard Catalog of World Coins, 2001-Date (14th edition). Krause Publications, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, USA. ISBN 9781440248979.
  • Thomas Michael (editor), Tracy L. Schmidt (editor); 2016. Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1601-1700 (7th edition). Krause Publications, Iola, Wisconsin, USA. ISBN 9781440248573.
  • Thomas Michael (editor); 2016. Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1701-1800 (7th edition). Krause Publications, Iola, Wisconsin, USA. ISBN 9781440247064.
  • Tracy L. Schmidt (editor); 2019. Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1801-1900 (9th edition). Krause Publications, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, USA. ISBN 9781440248955.
  • Tracy L. Schmidt (editor); 2019. Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1901-2000 (47th edition). Krause Publications, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, USA. ISBN 9781440248962.
Maillet# 16,
Prosper Mailliet; 1868. Atlas de monnaies obsidionales et de nécessité. Imprimeur Gobbaerts, Brussels, Belgium.
Noss Be# 525
Alfred Noss; 1929. Die Münzen von Jülich, Kleve, Berg und Mörs / Band 2. Die Münzen von Berg und Jülich-Berg. Kress & Hornung, Munich, Germany.

Obverse

Large FP monogram (for Friedrich Pithan, governor of Jülich), six similar stamps surrounding but each containing the denomination.

Lettering:
Large FP monogram (for Friedrich Pithan, governor of Jülich), six similar stamps surrounding but each containing the denomination.
FP
·: I6 ZI ·:· // · IN GVL= // BE LE=
G

Reverse

Uniface.

Comments

When the last duke of Jülich-Kleves-Berg died in 1609, a controversy over his territory broke out. The Elector of Brandenburg and the Count of Neuburg entered an agreement in which they would split the territory between themselves. Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II was not happy with these terms. He sent Archduke Leopold V, his cousin, to serve as the administrator of the disputed duchy. Leopold set up his headquarters in the fortress at Jülich, which was handed over to him by Baron Johann von Reuschenberg. The fortress, now under the control of the Holy Roman Empire, was besieged in 1610 by a large force composed of nations hostile to the Habsburgs. This siege prompted Leopold and Johann von Reuschenberg to abandon Jülich. After the siege, the Count of Neuburg and Elector of Brandenburg put into effect their original plan to split the territory of Jülich-Kleves-Berg. They put the Dutchman Frederik Pithan in control of the fortress at Jülich. This, in effect, meant that the United Provinces controlled the fortress. In 1621, when the Dutch ceasefire with Spain expired, Spain invaded the United Provinces and besieged the Jülich fortress. After a costly siege, Spain took the fortress.

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Date VG F VF XF AU UNC
1621  16z1

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