Is this coin an error? [solved]

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I found this coin going though a lot that I bought and have never seen this before. The coin on the left appears to have been over squeezed in the die, is this possible? I'm fairly new at this. Thanks!

Interesting. Perhaps 2 planchets stuck together? Just a wild guess. Did you weigh it?

Edit: Or a die cap (planchet stuck to the die for multiple strikes) although the reverse looks too clean for that.
At first I thought it is a "dryer coin", the obverse could be a very nice example of that but I'm not sure the reverse fits in that theory: https://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=143863
Quote: "Essor Prof"​At first I thought it is a "dryer coin", the obverse could be a very nice example of that but I'm not sure the reverse fits in that theory: https://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=143863
​Hadn't thought of that. Problem though is the diameter would be reduced. This coin has a larger diameter than a normal penny.
Quote: "rsirian1"​​​Hadn't thought of that. Problem though is the diameter would be reduced. This coin has a larger diameter than a normal penny.
​You're completely right. Dryer coins have a smaller diameter. I've made a wrong assumption: I saw the L of Liberty was vanished, but not because the diameter shrunk but because it disappeared under that thick rim.
Weight is 3.514 g vs 3.043 for normal
Diameter is 19.8 mm vs 19.0
Thickness is 1.9 mm vs 1.4 mm

When you look at the reverse, you can see where the normal edge of the coin is formed, but it has extra material that appears to be coming from the front. Could the top die been worn and did not cut the material cleanly?

The "I" is formed cleanly, I can't see the "L" of Liberty to see if it was struck okay. That is about where the material starts to push up.
looks like foreign matter, like a thin ring. it looks like it could be pried off with a tiny screw driver.
In any case I'm sure it didn't come out of the dies like that.
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
The die doesn't cut. It just stamps the coin with the imprint. I think you're right about the material appearing to be coming from the front. I'd love to see a cross section. I imagine it would look something like this:

Like the fully pressed coin has a collar around it. That would explain the extra weight. The question would be how that could happen in the minting process. Perhaps the "collar" broke off a die cap coin and got embedded on this one.
Quote: "Mr. Midnight"​looks like foreign matter, like a thin ring. it looks like it could be pried off with a tiny screw driver.
​In any case I'm sure it didn't come out of the dies like that.
​I'm starting to believe you're right. That's a much better explanation. Just a lucky mating of two compatible shapes. It would also explain how if could be circulated for 64 years and not be nabbed by somebody as a mint error.
It could of been a ring that was pressed onto this coin, but it is fused to it.

This coin was placed in a plastic roll container with 50 uncirculated 1960 cents. So I think the collector knew what he had. But all the coins that I bought in this lot were from 1909 to 1962. So I think he stopped collecting in the early 60s.

I had never heard of dryer coins, so thank you for that information but I don't think that is what this is.

I'm still curious about how this was formed. Years ago I designed automotive dies and this ring looks like excess material that was trimmed from another coin and then pressed/fused on this coin. The image on the coin appears perfect but hard to see under the material. But the cross section drawn looks very close.
There seem to my eyes be an exter ally added material to the coin it looks post mint done aswell. Granted thats just me going by my gut feeling and work experience in metalworking. Looks to be fit welded or some type of ring attached on the outside
Thank you everyone for helping me with this. I agree that it appears to be a ring that was added after the coin was struck. Looking under high magnification there might be an epoxy that is holding it together. Very hard to see but the reflection I see makes me think it might have been glued on.
Status changed to Solved (madingman, 8-Apr-2021, 04:35AM)

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