1928 Philadelphia Peace Dollar, worth grading in UK ?

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I have the above mentioned coin, and was wondering if it was worth getting it graded and slabbed. I'm in the UK, and not sure of any grading companies, or whether it would be worth doing, as the US dollars don't have the same cachet in the UK as they do in the USA.
NGC does have a place in the U.K. that you can send you coins to be graded link below.

https://www.ngccoin.uk/

Hope this helps.
Photos? Condition? Grade? The 1928 P is the key date in the series as they were the lowest mintage of the series and can be quite valuable. For that reason, it is imperative that you authenticate it first as there are quality counterfeits out there. If it is in fact genuine, it may be worth sending it in for grading, especially in higher grades.

Took a couple of pictures. It came in a bulk lot of coins a few years ago, so the surface is a bit marked, maybe someone tried to clean it. It weighs 26.75gr, 38.13 mm diameter and about 2.65mm thick. Had hundreds of peace and Morgan dollars and tried looking for key dates, thought I had more '28s but they were '23s with 3s nearly closed. Don't seem to get more than scrap selling in the UK.
On the face of it, everything looks to be genuine. In spite of the detracting and obvious and unfortunate scratches and stains, the details are still very nice. I would estimate it would grade at about XF40 or so depending who is grading it. Here are some resources for you to judge and approximate values once slabbed and graded. Personally I would be happy to own that coin just the way it is. Please do not sell it for scrap. :o
https://www.pcgs.com/photograde#/Peace/Grades


https://www.pcgs.com/prices/detail/peace-dollar/26/most-active
Quote: "harryg"​On the face of it, everything looks to be genuine. In spite of the detracting and obvious and unfortunate scratches and stains, the details are still very nice. I would estimate it would grade at about XF40 or so depending who is grading it. Here are some resources for you to judge and approximate values once slabbed and graded. Personally I would be happy to own that coin just the way it is. Please do not sell it for scrap. :o
https://www.pcgs.com/photograde#/Peace/Grades


https://www.pcgs.com/prices/detail/peace-dollar/26/most-active
​Thanks, I would never scrap coins, unless totally wrecked. I was buying in bulk lots at auctions a few years ago, just trying to "stack" a bit of silver. I then found out that some of the coins were way more valuable than scrap. I would sort through them, picking out any choice examples, and would then put the not so good stuff on ebay. Being in the UK, British coins sell better than American - or any other foreign countries coins. Americans will probably have the reverse experience of US coins selling better than British. Over the years I have become more interested in the coin rather than the metal, but wouldn't call myself a collector, more an accumulator.
Quote: "Worldwide collection"​NGC does have a place in the U.K. that you can send you coins to be graded link below.

https://www.ngccoin.uk/

​Hope this helps.

​Thanks, I may take a train ride there and ask questions.
The Phila. mint 1928 dollar is a particularly choice key date coin. Even a damaged one is valuable.
I do not like the wire brush marks. Absolutely have it authenticated.
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
It is hard not to be dubious of the wear in the spot where the S mint mark would be. A very common tactic to make it look like a regular 1928. Definitely have it sent to be graded. The upside of it possibly being a legitimate 1928 from Philadelphia is worth the relatively minor cost of having it graded.
Quote: "harryg"I would estimate it would grade at about XF40 or so depending who is grading it.
​Isn't that fundamentally wrong? Paying professionals tens of dollars to grade a coin and then the result depends on who's doing the job?
Quote: "Essor Prof"
Quote: "harryg"I would estimate it would grade at about XF40 or so depending who is grading it.
​​Isn't that fundamentally wrong? Paying professionals tens of dollars to grade a coin and then the result depends on who's doing the job?
​Perfection can only be achieved in a perfect world. The problem and the reality is that we are dealing with human beings with different levels of experience and training with varying opinions and perspectives not to mention different pay grades . Some more conservative in their grading, others more generous. PCGS, NGC, ANACS, ICG, all competing. I know who I prefer. Do you prefer a particular one? Why? Cost? Reputation? How many coins are these graders expected to grade in day? Quotas? Pressure? Not enough staff? How many times do folks send their already graded coins for regrading because they disagree with the stated grade? How many grading companies fell by the wayside and failed for all these reasons? No, fundamentally not perfect but it's the best we have. Regardless, I buy the coin and not necessarily what the slab claims it to be. In fact , I prefer raw coins to slabbed coins.
Quote: "Tovarich"​It is hard not to be dubious of the wear in the spot where the S mint mark would be. A very common tactic to make it look like a regular 1928. Definitely have it sent to be graded. The upside of it possibly being a legitimate 1928 from Philadelphia is worth the relatively minor cost of having it graded.
​This is absolutely true and why I looked very hard at that particular area. I magnified the photo as large as I could and really could not detect anything suspicious. I am not implying that it couldn't be possible but it certainly is not obvious on the photo provided. To be sure however, there is no substitute for viewing it in hand with a jewelers loupe.

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