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Hey when did the US stop hand puching the mint mark on 1 cent [solved]

10 posts
I was thinking the US stop hand punching mint mark an was on the master. To make the dies. But here is an 1988 D with mint marks in different location. Is this from two different master,
D under 9 D under 8

thank you yours daryl
It is, what it is.
Oh there is more space between the 8's in the mint mark under the 8 . Then the 8 . in mint mark under 9
It is, what it is.
When the Mint started using mint marks (letters) in the early 1800's to identify the various branch mints at which coins were being struck, the mint mark was hand punched into the working dies that would be striking the coins. A die maker would take a thin steel rod (punch) that had the mint mark engraved on one end and hold it in place on the working die where the mint mark was to be applied. Using a mallet he tapped an impression of the mint mark into the die. In most cases it was necessary to strike the punch more than once with the mallet in order to leave a satisfactory impression of the mint mark in the die.
1989 was the last year of the hand-punched mint-marks on US coins. Hand punching of mintmarks on proof dies ended in 1985. After that they started phasing them out on the business strike coins/denominations. They were completely switched over by 1990 and the cents were the last denomination to have punched mintmarks.
Those who believe they can do something and those who believe they can't are both right.
- Henry Ford
Thank you again Ed. I thought they stop no later than the mid 1980's.
It is, what it is.
Quote: "edduns"​When the Mint started using mint marks (letters) in the early 1800's to identify the various branch mints at which coins were being struck, the mint mark was hand punched into the working dies that would be striking the coins. A die maker would take a thin steel rod (punch) that had the mint mark engraved on one end and hold it in place on the working die where the mint mark was to be applied. Using a mallet he tapped an impression of the mint mark into the die. In most cases it was necessary to strike the punch more than once with the mallet in order to leave a satisfactory impression of the mint mark in the die.
​1989 was the last year of the hand-punched mint-marks on US coins. Hand punching of mintmarks on proof dies ended in 1985. After that they started phasing them out on the business strike coins/denominations. They were completely switched over by 1990 and the cents were the last denomination to have punched mintmarks.
​Ed,
Correct me if I am wrong but does it mean that let's say in 1988, five and a quarter billion of 1 cent coins (5,253,740,443 to be exact) were MANUALLY punched with the D mint mark in Denver?
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No "A die maker would take a thin steel rod (punch) that had the mint mark engraved on one end and hold it in place on the working die where the mint mark was to be applied. Using a mallet he tapped an impression of the mint mark into the die."
You could wear out a mans hands doing it that way. ha ha
Those who believe they can do something and those who believe they can't are both right.
- Henry Ford
This is exactly what I meant - even if you use the whole population of Denver and give each person a die and a mallet, it would take them years to hand-punch 5 billion coins. But than - what the term "hand punching" means?
蝸牛そろそろ登れ富士の山
Katatsumuri sorosoro nobore fujinoyama
The dies were hand punched with the d. Not the coins. Right?
Yes the dies were hand punched , not the coin.
It is, what it is.
Quote: "ALLRED1950"​ Yes the dies were hand punched , not the coin.
​Thanks, I should have guessed...
蝸牛そろそろ登れ富士の山
Katatsumuri sorosoro nobore fujinoyama

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