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American Buffalo coin question

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Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 95
Hi everyone. I bought this coin on eBay but I am confused. It is exactly the same as the one pictured, an early American 5 cent coin with an Indian's head on one side and a buffalo upon the other. There is one small difference however. The one I have has no date upon it. Everything else is there, just no date, not even a very worn date and I have looked very very carefully. Is it a fake? The picture is rather small but the date is supposed to be lower left side of the "Indian's Head" side. If mine is a fake, are fakes actually worth anything?
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 95
Solved my own question.... Google is a wonderful thing :)
Seems that when these coins were minted, the dates kinda stood above the other details and so with use were worn away rather quickly, so my coin is not fake. It is also worth absolutely nothing as without a date a coin really has no intrinsic value other than the metal it is made of and these coins were made from nickel hence the term.
Interestingly, I have just learned why a nickel is called a nickel. :)
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
Jesse11
Joined: 30-Dec-2015
Posts: 1073
They do sell weak acid solutions specifically for revealing the date on these. (I think one brand is called "Nic-a-Date".) I expect the value would still be worthless is you have to resort to that, but it might be fun for curiosity's sake to see what the date was.
aaronmgd
Joined: 9-Jan-2013
Posts: 571
Quote: "Kipsley" just no date, not even a very worn date
​Did you try looking at it magnified at different angles?
Courtesy is the one coin you can never have too much of or be stingy with.

Coin collecting is the only hobby where you can spend all your money and still have some left.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 4455
Fun fact; if the issue you bought was EXACTLY the same type that was pictured in your post, then an exact year can be deduced! If your coin's reverse (the side with the buffalo) has a raised ground, as opposed to simply a line with FIVE CENTS underneath, then your issue is definitely a 1913, since that was the first and only year of issue with the raised ground.

They changed it because of the same issue with the date; the raised ground made the denomination rub off easily. Between this and the Liberty V 'Five Dollar' gold -plated nickel, it seems like the Five-Cent coin is one that has caused the US Mint many a headache.
Une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Jesse11
Joined: 30-Dec-2015
Posts: 1073
The date 1913 is clearly visible to me in the photo. I think this was just a stock photo of the coin type, not the one under discussion.
Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 95
Yes. It was just a stock photo to show what I was looking for. It is not my actual coin. God point about the raised ground on the buffalo side. Mine has the line, so not 1913. At least I know that now :)
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
sarikanair
Joined: 30-Nov-2017
Posts: 53
Be very careful nowadays, there are many counterfeit coins circulating in the market. Before purchasing a coin, make sure you get it tested from the experts.
aaronmgd
Joined: 9-Jan-2013
Posts: 571
Quote: "sarikanair"​Be very careful nowadays, there are many counterfeit coins circulating in the market. Before purchasing a coin, make sure you get it tested from the experts.
​not an issue with no date buffalo nickels...

Aaron
Courtesy is the one coin you can never have too much of or be stingy with.

Coin collecting is the only hobby where you can spend all your money and still have some left.
Numismatist uk
Joined: 2-Jan-2018
Posts: 700
Due to the position of the date (bottom left) it easily wears.
I'd say its genuine.
Too look for rare date or mint marks use nicadate.
Coin collector and Silver stacker
'We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.'
Sir Winston Churchill
Coinguy1960
Joined: 5-Jun-2015
Posts: 25
Numismatist uk is 100% correct.
The date is the highest point of the coin and wears out very easily.
I myself have a few dateless buffalo coins.
mark pratt
PaulDeLucchi
Joined: 21-Dec-2016
Posts: 16
You should watch this video on how to read the date on a date less buffalo nickel.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_byKQQCozQ


I tried it and it kinda worked but I would not recommend it. I"ve got almost 5 rolls on no date buffaloes.
In my younger "hell raising " days, I would find a young cute girl at the local fast food place and pay with a dateless buffalo ... and then watch all hell break loose.. fun times!!
Numismatist uk
Joined: 2-Jan-2018
Posts: 700
Quote: "Coinguy1960"​Numismatist uk is 100% correct.
​The date is the highest point of the coin and wears out very easily.
​I myself have a few dateless buffalo coins.

​Here is the BIG question,
would you use nicadate?

I myself have never seen one in real life being here in the uk but I have done a lot of research of U.S. coinage recently and now 1/17 of my whole collection is American.

I have a '67 40% half and other miscellaneous 90%.

Do you coin roll hunt?
There is little to look for in the uk other than foreign commemorative and copper.

Good luck to all those fellow collectors 'across the pond' including yourself,
N.uk
Coin collector and Silver stacker
'We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.'
Sir Winston Churchill
flat5263
Joined: 26-Nov-2012
Posts: 7
Hello, again. These terribly designed coins are a collector's nightmare. The date (same on Standing Liberty quarters) is on a "high spot" which means when 10 pieces of candy were bought with this nickle, it was scraped across a glass or wood countertop. Years of use wore them down. MANY Buffalo Nickles have lost their dates. There is a process of "acid dating" a nickle. When a certain acid is applied, the date will show because some metal is denser due to the stamping process. In time, I forget- hours to weeks!! the acid-revealed date will disappear. It may be costly for a numismatist to acid date a coin. I never did it, so I have no idea of cost!
Canaan
Joined: 16-Jan-2018
Posts: 1194
Hi,
You can compare with the mine I bought on Ebay. Identical, isn't it ?
« Celui qui ne cherche rien ne trouve rien. »
(Saint-Exupéry)
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 469
Dateless Buffaloes generally have little value--about 7 to 10 cents each, to people to intend to use them in belt buckles or jewelry.

"Nicadate", "Nickel Date Restorer" or similar acids cost about $10 per bottle. You can find them on Amazon or at coin shops.

It will make the date identifiable, but I do not agree that the acid dating goes away--I have some I acquired 40 years ago, on which you can still tell they were acid dated.

Generally, acid dated coins have minimal value. However, if you find a key date, such as a 1913S Type II, or the 1918D 8/7, they are still of some value to a date collector who wants a hole filler in their coin album.

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