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Help grading some coins

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nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Hello,

I'm just starting to grade my coin collection. So far, i've only graded some common and low value coins, but i want to be a little more precise when it comes to more valuable or older coins. So, it would really help if you could tell me how you would grade the following coins, so that i can have a refference for the future:

1896 Old queen Victoria penny


1923 Peace dollar


1895 Barber quarter


1775 Holed colonial real (Potosí mint)


1964 Silver half dollar


Old queen Victoria farthing


Young queen Victoria half penny



So, i really don't know how to grade them, some help would be really nice!!
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 6418
Are holed coins really eligible for normal grades? Slabbing companies would probably send it back.
Une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Yeah, i think they are not elegible, it would be something like 'grade-details' i think. But anyways, let's imagine for a moment it's not, what grade would you give it?
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Ps. i'm looking for reference on the G-VG-F... scale, not the full 70 grade
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 6418
Well, I'll give you my opinions, using basic grades but obligatory disclaimer; I'm not a professional grader and what you get from other members may vary.

1. XF
2. XF
3. F
4. F (pretending the hole isn't there)
5. F+
6. VF
7. F
Une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
pnightingale
Joined: 27-Jul-2011
Posts: 5101
VF/F
EF
VG
F+ (Holed)
VF
F (Details - Altered surfaces)
VG

Notes:

Note the difference between the 1896 1d and the Farthing. Although they appear to be superficially the same the Queen has a motif on her shoulder (Order of the Garter?) which has worn away on the 1/4d along with the hair at her temple. These, along with the necklace and the folds in her veil are the key points in deciding if a coin is F or VF which applies to most coins from the period. There are other markers but they are not as consistently useful or they come into play at higher grades so concentrate your efforts there. Most of the elements should remain on a VF coin and be well defined, anything substantially less is F. On the reverse you should concentrate on Britannia's shield, helmet and her hand grasping the trident. A VF coin should show each component of the shield, most of the visor on the helmet and each finger on her hand. There are online photo grading guides available but they tend to overcomplicate the subject, it's much easier and more consistent to concentrate on the key points.

Each series is different but once you learn the basics of one you can quite safely apply them to others. It's just not possible to learn the wear patterns of every series in one lifetime so superficial grading guided by a few general rules is the best we can hope for. The best advice I can give you is to familiarize yourself with the higher grades so that you get an understanding of just how much detail has been lost. It's depressingly common to find those coins with high relief designs grossly overgraded, for UK coins it's George V with Edward VII running a close second. It's been my experience that most collectors and dealers overgrade these by at least one full grade.

So, the 1/4d is F but has some ugly gouges on the obverse and looks to have been the victim of some abrasive cleaning on the reverse. (bright copper!) The 1d has a far better portrait but a poor reverse, which can be graded VF/F or it can be expressed as a net grade -VF. I prefer to avoid net grades as it's not as accurate. However don't fall into the trap of overusing the split grade. Swiss coins, for example almost always have a better "tails" than "heads" so it's quite pointless to describe each coin as F/VF.

Post mint damage such as holes, cleaning or damage don't affect the grade and should be noted separately.
Non illegitimis carborundum est.  Excellent advice for all coins.
Supreme Ruler and Dictator for Life of the 6th Avenue Coin, Stamp  & Rice Puller Club. President, Boss & Top Dawg for Hutt River.
Ollisaarinen
Joined: 10-Aug-2010
Posts: 328
I agree on pnightingale's grading. Here is a photo from the standard grading guide:
The ship has now become a mere outline and much of the design is now flat.
This one is graded as fair.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Thanks to all for your answers, specially pnightingale! I feel like i'm learning more and more on this forum. Some questions have emerged because of your response: what would it take for the penny to be graded as XF? Some details not present in my coin, and your grading is done by comparing it to a better coin? Also, do you have further advice on what to look for when grading a coin which i don't know, haven't seen before, etc (what i mean, can i grade a coin by just looking at it?). Maybe some kind of tutorial online could help. And again, thanks a lot!
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
1. VF-XF (photo is too dark to see if XF)
2. XF
3. G-VG (to be VG, you need three letters of LIBERTY. I see only half L, half T and Y.)
4. F holed
5. VF (cleaned/brushed)
6. VF
7. G
pnightingale
Joined: 27-Jul-2011
Posts: 5101
An EF coin will have all but the tiniest details present with wear only on the very highest points and largely clear fields. Copper and bronze coins may retain some of the original bright red colour but this isn't essential. For higher grade coins you should be looking less at the portrait or main design and looking for details inside of details, if that makes sense?

Ultimately grading coins can be considered as a comparison against the coin "as struck". You are deciding how much wear has taken place, so in that respect unless you are familiar with what a truly mint state coin looks like you are probably going to have an uphill battle. It won't take long to realise that there is a typical grade for a period and that most of the coins from say the 1920s fall into one or two grades. That will save you a lot of time when grading large lots.

There's plenty of information available but far too much of it is vague or just plain wrong. Grading standards have shifted downwards since they were first introduced back in the early days and many coin cataogs are still using the same illustrations from two generations ago. Online guides are somewhat better having at least current illustrations but many are the creation of people with little knowledge. The best sources are those which concentrate on a specific series and include high quality pictures of the same coin in all possible grades.
Non illegitimis carborundum est.  Excellent advice for all coins.
Supreme Ruler and Dictator for Life of the 6th Avenue Coin, Stamp  & Rice Puller Club. President, Boss & Top Dawg for Hutt River.
scceda
Joined: 25-Sep-2011
Posts: 556
1. VF
2. VF
3. G
4. VG (holed)
5. VF (cleaned)
6. F+ (cleaned)
7. VG
I don't send via registered mail with very few exceptions. My swap list is for sale.
Essor Prof
Joined: 13-Apr-2015
Posts: 2020
Summary:


(with red being the average grade)

Remark:
No coin got the same grade from every one and for 2 coins the difference is already 2 full grades, between only 5 opinions, showing how difficult it is to give a correct grade. Yet, over the years several members demand for even more grades and divide every full grade in a +, a neutral and a -. If we already can't find a consensus in full grades, what's the sense of dividing the grades even more?
pnightingale
Joined: 27-Jul-2011
Posts: 5101
I like the +/- modifiers my dear EP and I like to use the split grades where appropriate. A coin does have two sides after all. Anything which can bring us closer to the rumored accuracy of the Sheldon Scale but without the associated pretentions, I'm generally in favor of.

I'd probably defer to our friend halfdisme on the subject of US coins which are very much a secondary interest for me. I only started to actively collect them in 2000 when I first arrived here. For UK coins, I'm pretty confident that after more than 50 years I can grade them accurately but for anything else it's just superficial grading at best. I have no idea where the key wear points are on Mexican or Chinese coins and neither the time or interest to learn. I know what a VF coin struck in England during the same period looks like and just use that as a comparison, if I truly can't decide I go for the lower grade or in the case of a more expensive coin I just send a message to someone who has a more specialized understanding.

An interesting and cautionary tale which seems appropriate to the conversation. Some years ago I accepted a very substantial exchange because the person offering it was someone I had come to consider as very conservative when applying grades in topics such as this one. What I ended up receiving was grossly overgraded by at least a full grade and most of it ended up going right into my junk silver bin. I reckon it's easy to fall into the trap of seeing what you want to see.

I've also during the course of many swaps received my own coins back on more than one occasion. Still in the 2x2 with my handwriting on the label but with the original VF grade scratched out and an EF or in one case an AU substituted. I don't make a fuss about it as it might have passed through many hands so there's no way of knowing who made the change. But it sure is frustrating.

One useful thing I have learned over the years - always grade your coin before you look up it's value and stick with your original guess. That way you avoid the temptation to stretch the grade upwards for an extra $50 and on the other hand you don't get intimidated into downgrading it by a hefty price tag.
Non illegitimis carborundum est.  Excellent advice for all coins.
Supreme Ruler and Dictator for Life of the 6th Avenue Coin, Stamp  & Rice Puller Club. President, Boss & Top Dawg for Hutt River.
oggy Numista team, Moderator
Joined: 8-Mar-2016
Posts: 1437
1st is VF. Way too much missing to be anywhere close to XF or even VF+.
2nd XF
3rd G maybe, but a details grade anyway, so maybe would sneak to VG details
4th F - None of the letters on the pillars are visible, nor are the gems on the crown, and the obverse portrait is just a silhouette
5th - Dunno, never had one of these. VF maybe? Suffered a nasty scrubbing though.
6th - F details, altered surfaces
7th - Junk

None of these are particularly valuable though, and most wouldn't be even in mint state. (except for the barber quarter). The potosi real is probably the most common mint,
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Thanks to all for your answers! Does anyone know if there is some site where i can look for uncirculated coin pictures, so that i can compare them to my own?
pnightingale
Joined: 27-Jul-2011
Posts: 5101
Quote: "nagarrido"​Thanks to all for your answers! Does anyone know if there is some site where i can look for uncirculated coin pictures, so that i can compare them to my own?
Yes Sir! Tony Clayton has a great site for UK coins. It also has values but these haven't been maintained for some while. It has probably the best collection of high quality photos to be found anywhere. It's very useful when trying to identify varieties but I could just spend hours browsing through his albums.

http://www.coins-of-the-uk.co.uk/​
Non illegitimis carborundum est.  Excellent advice for all coins.
Supreme Ruler and Dictator for Life of the 6th Avenue Coin, Stamp  & Rice Puller Club. President, Boss & Top Dawg for Hutt River.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Thanks again! Btw, i just compared my penny to an EF Victoria penny, and now i see that some parts are clearly rubbed away.
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
The Krause catalogs generally have photos of high grade or Uncirculated examples of many types.
For U. S. coins, Photograde is a book that shows photos (with word descriptions) for the grades of all many types.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Are Karuse catalogs available online? I'll have a look next week
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "nagarrido"​Are Karuse catalogs available online? I'll have a look next week
​The correct answer is--yes and no. The NGC World Coin Price Guide is online, and it was prepared from the Krause database (Numismaster), and it can be found at:

https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/

Unfortunately, there are many photos in the Krause catalogs (official name "Standard Catalog of World Coins"), which are not in the NGC guide.

The Numista catalog has photos of high grade coins for many of the listings.
David52
Joined: 10-Dec-2014
Posts: 226
See? That's why I don't put grades on my coins. Ask five different people to grade your coins and you will get five different answers. It seems every body has a different opinion on the the grading. I had a coin I thought was VG or F and the person I sent it to said it should be a VF. Good in this case but could the other way, then get a bad comment. what's a collect to do?
American collector living the life in Germany
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Grading is an art, not a science. You will get different answers, even from the third party grading services. PCGS once announced that they had reached the milestone of regrading ONE MILLION coins.

You can get a general feel of grading from experience, but XF vs AU is always a problem, and we have not even touched on the striking characteristics of the coins--U. S. Colonial coins will usually grade at least one grade higher than what a novice would expect, because of the crude strikings.

And there is always the argument of "American" vs "European" grading. The claim is that European grades are more strict (less wear); but often, when I have bought coins from Europeans, their "selling" grading standards were lower than American standards.

I had three USA 1926 commemorative half dollars that I showed to three third party graders for verbal opinions, and each time, the grades were MS63, MS63 and MS64--but the one chosen as MS64 kept changing! I finally submitted them to ANACS to be slabbed, and they came back MS63, MS63, and MS62.

I had two US five dollar gold coins that PCGS graded as AU58. I showed them to a PCGS grader, and said that I did not understand why they were AU58. He understood--he said they were MS63, and PCGS reslabbed them as such.
Essor Prof
Joined: 13-Apr-2015
Posts: 2020
Quote: "David52"​That's why I don't put grades on my coins. what's a collect to do?

​That's one of the reasons I also don't put grades on my coins on my exchange list. I always make scans of my coins in a swap and my swap partner can see for himself if the quality of the coins are satisfactory.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Quote: "halfdisme"but XF vs AU is always a problem
​Any advice on this matter? Also, is the uncirculated grade exclusive for uncirculated coins, or it applies to 'coins that seem perfectly uncirculated'? I know it sounds a bit stupid, but anyways... Also, thanks for the link! I'll look into it
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "nagarrido"
Quote: "halfdisme"but XF vs AU is always a problem
​​Any advice on this matter? Also, is the uncirculated grade exclusive for uncirculated coins, or it applies to 'coins that seem perfectly uncirculated'? I know it sounds a bit stupid, but anyways... Also, thanks for the link! I'll look into it
​Uncirculated applies to coins that have no circulation wear. They may even have bagmarks--from being transported in bags (in the old days). Always look for wear on the high points, and learn how to distinguish wear from a weak strike. A weakly struck coin, without wear, is still Uncirculated.

My standard for XF is that it has very little wear, even if it has little luster. AU will have only some rub on the high points, and significant luster.

Some people pretend that the AU grades do not exist--especially when they are buying.
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "Essor Prof"
Quote
​​That's one of the reasons I also don't put grades on my coins on my exchange list. I always make scans of my coins in a swap and my swap partner can see for himself if the quality of the coins are satisfactory.
​While I understand your standpoint, do you understand how cumbersome it makes things for someone trying to go through a thousands-of-items swap list with no grading. I generally cannot use modern coins that are not Uncirculated (every rule has exceptions). How can I put a trade proposal together?

At least put "Unc" and "circ" on your trade list.
Essor Prof
Joined: 13-Apr-2015
Posts: 2020
Quote: "halfdisme"​​​While I understand your standpoint, do you understand how cumbersome it makes things for someone trying to go through a thousands-of-items swap list with no grading. I generally cannot use modern coins that are not Uncirculated (every rule has exceptions). How can I put a trade proposal together?

​At least put "Unc" and "circ" on your trade list.

Since you ask it so nicely I'll give you some more information why I won't and can't grade the coins on my swap list, beside the fact that, like you said, grading is an art not a science, and there never was, never is and never will be a consensus about coin grading :

- ​First of all, I even can't add a grade for my doubles because I detest the new adding version and still use the old one. If I hadn't the choice to return to the old system I probably wouldn't even be here any more.
- I find it important to have my lists as correct as possible and a mistake is so easily made. So I put a lot of time and effort to watch over the correctness of my additions. I have 40.000 different coins (estimate) and 80.000 doubles (estimate) and after 3 years of membership I only have 20 to 25% added to the database. So I don't want to loose time to check if a double is F or VF when I see I already have an UNC in my collection. And I certainly don't want to loose time to check again for grades all those 16.500 doubles already added to the database.

I know my reasons might not be applicable for other members but they are for me, and I hope you can understand that. If that implicates some members don't want to swap with me, so be it.

And a friendly advice for you: if you can't use modern coins that are not UNC I strongly suggest you put that on your profile.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Quote: "halfdisme"
Quote: "nagarrido"

Quote: "halfdisme"but XF vs AU is always a problem
​​​Any advice on this matter? Also, is the uncirculated grade exclusive for uncirculated coins, or it applies to 'coins that seem perfectly uncirculated'? I know it sounds a bit stupid, but anyways... Also, thanks for the link! I'll look into it
​​Uncirculated applies to coins that have no circulation wear.

​But could a coin that has been, maybe a couple of months in circulation, be graded as uncirculated (if it has no wear), or it MUST be uncirculated to be graded as that? In that case i would grade it as AU, but i don't know really
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
To be Uncirculated, it should show NO signs of wear.

It could have been minted years ago, but still be Uncirculated, if it has been in an original bank roll, or stored in some manner.

If it shows any wear, it is not Uncirculated.
oggy Numista team, Moderator
Joined: 8-Mar-2016
Posts: 1437
Quote: "halfdisme"​To be Uncirculated, it should show NO signs of wear.

​It could have been minted years ago, but still be Uncirculated, if it has been in an original bank roll, or stored in some manner.

​If it shows any wear, it is not Uncirculated.


If only this were universally true, life would be easier. Barber quarters for example often get MS with wear evident on several stars
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
If it is really due to a weak strike, and not wear, they are correct.

If they are "commercial Uncs", they are cheating.

If the third party grading services were perfect, there never would have been a market/demand for CAC--and no service would have ever done a million regrades!

Having state that, it is also true that grading has changed over the years--in both directions.

And I have seen recently graded coins with scratches (and no indication on the holder), that would have been returned ungraded in past years.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Has anyone bought a Krause catalog? is it worth it?
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "nagarrido"​Has anyone bought a Krause catalog? is it worth it?
​I usually buy each one as it comes out, but I have not bought the 2019 editions yet.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Quote: "halfdisme"
Quote: "nagarrido"​Has anyone bought a Krause catalog? is it worth it?
​​I usually buy each one as it comes out, but I have not bought the 2019 editions yet.
​If I buy an older one (2016, for example), are there major differences with the more recent editions? The problem is that they are not sold in my country (Chile), so if i buy them on amazon (the only site I will be able to buy them) they will be waaay more expensive than the real price, so maybe I could buy an older edition
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "nagarrido"
Quote: "halfdisme"

Quote: "nagarrido"​Has anyone bought a Krause catalog? is it worth it?
​​​I usually buy each one as it comes out, but I have not bought the 2019 editions yet.
​​If I buy an older one (2016, for example), are there major differences with the more recent editions? The problem is that they are not sold in my country (Chile), so if i buy them on amazon (the only site I will be able to buy them) they will be waaay more expensive than the real price, so maybe I could buy an older edition
​Each Krause catalog is for a century of coin issues (in addition to the Unusual World Coins catalog), and only the two covering 1901 to date have new editions every year.

Especially if your main focus is 1901-2000, my advice would be to (1) buy the newest edition that you can afford; and (2) compare the prices to the NGC World Coin Price Guide at
https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/

The NGC guide is based on the Numismaster database (which is the Krause database for all its catalogs), but the hardcopy catalogs have much more data and photos than the online catalog. Also, I do not know how often the online catalog is updated, and I have seen some glaring errors in it.
Wealth101
Joined: 1-Jun-2018
Posts: 36
After reading all the posts, I realize the main interest is in UK or USA coin grading.
However, I would still like to offer up a very handy grading book for Canadian coins: "Standard Grading Guide for Canadian & Colonial Decimal Coins (Charlton/Willey). Revised 1999.

This is an amazingly detailed picture book, broken down into small segments of years for the types and different face values. Each segment has pictures (drawings) of grades from G to AU. There are arrows pointing to certain "wear" areas for each grade on both obverse and reverse, with short dialogue commentary underneath. I have found it very astute in assisting me to grade my Canadian coins, until I get to the EF to AU grade. These two grades are difficult to separate and I'm left with no grade to assign, as there is no integrity in either over- or under-grading.

What I found after grading hundreds of Canadian coins was that the knowledge of wear was transferable to USA and World coins, with exceptions, of course. Exceptions can be cross-referenced to various websites to confirm the grading standard.

However, once the coins get into valuable territory (~$100+), my sense is a grading service should/may be used to confirm the always subjective personal grade. I'm still learning, and man what a time-consuming hobby this is becoming.
nagarrido
Joined: 4-Jun-2018
Posts: 20
Quote I'm still learning, and man what a time-consuming hobby this is becoming.
​But really fun! Maybe in the future i will collect more Canadian coins (i have a few, but newer ones), and i will look into that book!
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "Wealth101"I'm still learning, and man what a time-consuming hobby this is becoming.
​The time spent learning to grade--and the striking/luster characteristics of specific coins--can be very valuable to you. I once looked at a dealer's three Sesquicentennial commemorative half dollars as he said "I wish that they were Uncirculated." I bought them, and eventually had them graded by ANACS: MS 63, MS 63 and MS 62.
Wealth101
Joined: 1-Jun-2018
Posts: 36
Quote: "halfdisme"
Quote​​The time spent learning to grade--and the striking/luster characteristics of specific coins--can be very valuable to you. I once looked at a dealer's three Sesquicentennial commemorative half dollars as he said "I wish that they were Uncirculated." I bought them, and eventually had them graded by ANACS: MS 63, MS 63 and MS 62.
I falter when I have coins that appear to be MS, i.e. surfaces seem unmarked. I ask myself "Why, if they are UNC, have they been included in the auction lots I purchased?" The short answer is maybe I got lucky. I suppose I should join a coin club and get the benefit of others experience, although I'm more of a loner and don't seem to identify with "clubbies".

So I agree the time spent to be astute will eventually be very valuable; however, in the meantime, I am left with reliance on whatever research I can accomplish, and then only when stuck, ask others.​
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
Quote: "Wealth101"
Quote: "halfdisme"
Quote​​The time spent learning to grade--and the striking/luster characteristics of specific coins--can be very valuable to you. I once looked at a dealer's three Sesquicentennial commemorative half dollars as he said "I wish that they were Uncirculated." I bought them, and eventually had them graded by ANACS: MS 63, MS 63 and MS 62.
​I falter when I have coins that appear to be MS, i.e. surfaces seem unmarked. I ask myself "Why, if they are UNC, have they been included in the auction lots I purchased?" The short answer is maybe I got lucky. I suppose I should join a coin club and get the benefit of others experience, although I'm more of a loner and don't seem to identify with "clubbies".

​So I agree the time spent to be astute will eventually be very valuable; however, in the meantime, I am left with reliance on whatever research I can accomplish, and then only when stuck, ask others.​
​Personally, I have learned more "basics" at coin shows than I have learned in club meetings.
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 45
You people are way too generous. Generally all of the coins are below average for their types.

1. Fine, if that, I would say about fine, there is flatness on Victoria's head
2. aVF, common peace, dollar some detail, colour makes it look like some one has tried to clean it abrasively
3. Good to Good+ American G6 - for VG you need 3 letters of Liberty Visible, this coin has none and is a silhouette
4. Holed, but otherwise about Very Good
5. Fine to gFine (F15) - A very low grade for this coin, which is common in MS60 and MS63 (Uncirculated condition)
6. VG and that is being kind
7. Good if that (Any English copper/bronze after 1860 unless scarce date is worth melt value only if under VF condition) - 8c a penny, 4c a half and 2c a farthing.

Sorry, but I am known for my harsh grading. If you expect an A, you may get a B- off me.
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 45
Quote: "Ollisaarinen"​I agree on pnightingale's grading. Here is a photo from the standard grading guide:
The ship has now become a mere outline and much of the design is now flat.
​This one is graded as fair.
​I agree totally, but remember a British "Fair" is equivalent to G4/G6 in American form. An American Fair2 is equivalent to British poor or less, basically American fair is an incomplete silhouette and a coin so worn you can barely make out any type, whereas British means that detail is visible and letters can be made, the coin has a complete rim and some detail may be visible.
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince
Peter M. Graham
Joined: 1-Jul-2015
Posts: 896
I always like these posts. Let's me know if my grading skills are too generous / critical.

Based on Essor Prof's "red zone" (thanks for that!) I would have been with the herd except on #'s 4 and 6.

4. To me, holed coins are ruined and I don't bother grading.
6. Too much hair loss in the queens hair too make it to VF.

Thanks again everyone.
We were so busy deciding whether we could, we never asked ourselves whether we should!
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 605
I once saw the three opinions that the three professional graders had given on a 1795 half dollar, before the company gave its "consensus" opinion. Our mutual grades above were closer than theirs!! For the most part, it looks like we were within a half grade of each other.

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