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What attracts you to a coin?

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Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 154
I've often wondered about this as I tend to look for coins that have a "special look" about them. For me it's all about the toning or how it has those wonderful "woody" stripes on it. Some of my favorite coins are worth nothing really, but they have a wonderful double tone of red to blue, or are toned only around the rim. I have a wonderful collection of uncirculated Australian 1 cent and 2 cent coins and many of them are a deep blue or a bright dazzling red. But then I'm a girl and pretty shiny things attract me.

So what attracts you to a coin? Is it it's worth? It's rarity? Do you go for only XF and above? Is the Luster your thing? Or do they have to made of gold perhaps?

Do tell. I find another's collecting habits always interesting. :P
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
Not swapping at this time.
VintageCoin
Joined: 5-Feb-2018
Posts: 127
My top 3 :
1. Low Mintage !
2. Alot of details , specially copper coins..
3. Any silver coin .
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8000
For me it's usually the history behind a coin, or where it's from. That's why I buy coins mostly from before 1945; I like to imagine sometimes when going through my collection, where the piece of round metal or the piece of paper in my hand has been in its lifetime.

Maybe my Series of 1928 US note was once in the wallet of Al Capone or some Prohibition era bootlegger? Or maybe my chopmarked Spanish 8 reales travelled the world of the 18th century from Mexico to China? Or maybe my humble little pfennig was once in the pocket of this obscure, impoverished Austrian painter you might have heard of? :O

The other thing about coins I get attracted to is their provenance, where they come from; I am attracted to coins from exotic places like Kiau Chau, Ceylon, Hong Kong, and French Indochina (for no-longer existing countries, pair that with my historical interest). Always interesting to see a coin with German and Chinese on it at the same time.
une franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
cro321
Joined: 25-Mar-2016
Posts: 354
To me there are two factors, the history behind the coin and the metal of which it's made of. I like large silver coins however history is always more important to me than the metal its self. I'll gladly trade my large silver coins such as Morgan dollars for small medieval Croatian copper coins. :)
Cerulean
Joined: 1-Nov-2010
Posts: 1459
I enjoy holding everyday objects from the past. I feel like a time traveler.

I am also an organizational force of nature. I find sorting and organizing coin to be very relaxing.

A museum would be lucky to have me as a collection manager.
ThePoet
Joined: 13-Dec-2017
Posts: 34
I like the shapes. The triangular coin from Cook Islands is a favourite. The square Malaya coins are neat too. I saw thousands of Qing dynasty coins while in Dali, Yunnan all tied together through the hole in the center. The British East Africa coins with the center hole have elephant tusks around them. I have a square Indian two Annas 1923. I got it in change while travelling there. It is completely beat up but I wonder what kind of life it had. Did Ghandi ever touch it?
Iainmac
Joined: 25-Feb-2018
Posts: 446
Coins can be little works of art on a small disk of metal.
it's all about the artistry for me, no matter what the metal it has to be aesthetically appealing!.
people talking without speaking, people hearing without listening
Chech
Joined: 7-Jul-2017
Posts: 174
For me, it is usually either if it has an interesting history like an Edward the 8th coin or is from my ancestry like a Slavic coin.
I love Slavic coins.
just DM me if you would like to trade, I am currently looking for Rus' coins at the moment.
Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 154
You guys are so awesome, and I do see a commonality here with regards the history behind a coin or the perceived history of that coin. I collect Third Reich coins and I have often imagined if perhaps a German Soldier was given it as a wage, or an SS soldier paid for his cigarettes with it, or even if a poor jewish person was disgusted by the design and threw it into a burned out building. If only the coins could talk.

And I agree that I also like to collect coins from exotic places. I once lived in Hong Kong but was really too young to appreciate it. I was given 1 Hong Kong dollar a week as pocket money and I remember that big old silver coin in my hot little hand. Now I collect pre-change over Hong Kong coins and I have a pretty good collection of them as uncirculated. It is a bit hard to find the Hong Kong dollar coins as uncirculated though but I still like to troll eBay looking. 8)

But gosh. We are a romantic lot here. :P
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
Not swapping at this time.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8000
Quote: "Kipsley"​ I was given 1 Hong Kong dollar a week as pocket money and I remember that big old silver coin in my hot little hand.
​But gosh. We are a romantic lot here. :P
​Gotta correct you there as the Hong Kong referee, the Hong Kong 1 dollar coin used between 1960 and 1975 was copper-nickel rather than silver!

Unless you received this big old Victorian coin every week. :love:
une franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 154
Cass. I was about 5 years old and in my little hand that big old Hong Kong 1 dollar coin looked huge and was all shiny silver and I felt RICH! :8D

Next you'll be telling me fairies and unicorns don't exist.
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
Not swapping at this time.
luca biondi
Joined: 23-Sep-2017
Posts: 259
Really!....:snif:
Monninen1
Joined: 23-Oct-2017
Posts: 887
Coins from my wish list:

Details and letters https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces4801.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces42074.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces12779.html
Rare countries https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces8348.html
odd features, size, shape
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces102563.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces108329.html
Chech
Joined: 7-Jul-2017
Posts: 174
Another thing that attracts me to a coin is personal value.

It may just be a bin to coin one person but it is a good memory to me!
I love Slavic coins.
just DM me if you would like to trade, I am currently looking for Rus' coins at the moment.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8000
Quote: "Kipsley"​Cass. I was about 5 years old and in my little hand that big old Hong Kong 1 dollar coin looked huge and was all shiny silver and I felt RICH! :8D

​Next you'll be telling me fairies and unicorns don't exist.
​Hahaha, now that really would be cruel. X-D
une franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
esterhazi
Joined: 8-Sep-2015
Posts: 18
Quote: "Kipsley"​I've often wondered about this as I tend to look for coins that have a "special look" about them. For me it's all about the toning or how it has those wonderful "woody" stripes on it. Some of my favorite coins are worth nothing really, but they have a wonderful double tone of red to blue, or are toned only around the rim. I have a wonderful collection of uncirculated Australian 1 cent and 2 cent coins and many of them are a deep blue or a bright dazzling red. But then I'm a girl and pretty shiny things attract me.

​So what attracts you to a coin? Is it it's worth? It's rarity? Do you go for only XF and above? Is the Luster your thing? Or do they have to made of gold perhaps?

​Do tell. I find another's collecting habits always interesting. :P
​Kipsley you like my red coins?
manik100
Joined: 13-Jan-2018
Posts: 93
I like to collect all sorts of coins, but most importantly I like to get my hands on coins from countries that do not exist anymore, or pre WWI coins...the older the better. I am also a history buff, so the history of the coin also fascinates me.

I don't usually go for commemorative coins, unless it's some special event...and I don't consider olympics/winter olympics/peter rabbit/star wars/star trek/etc. as special events for coins. With that said, I would like to know if a coin exists with the image of the 1988 Seoul Olympics tiger...THAT I would like to get because growing up, I always wanted to get that tiger as a plush animal but never got one. All grown up now so a coin of it would be awesome :D

And if anyone has this coin, I would like to trade for something:
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces32563.html
PhilipBe
Joined: 28-Oct-2012
Posts: 77
Around the day in eighty worlds.

I collect coins from the every place and I feel like travelling the world.
Not forgetting the time travel. A lot of the coins are from states that does not exist anymore.
All this without leaving home.
Mitridat1974
Joined: 28-Aug-2016
Posts: 117
1) Fine and elaborate design (for this reason, Ukrainian commemorative coins are my favourite, while I ignore commemorative coins from many other countries of the world).
2) ships
3) crocodiles.
4) emergency coins or semi-legal circulating issues (German Notgeld, Canadian pre-Confederation tokens, etc.)
My (still modest) collection:
https://en.numista.com/echanges/voir_collection.php?id=75443
Kipsley
Joined: 3-Feb-2018
Posts: 154
I never actually thought about it, but I also tend to go for coins that are from places, countries, or political eras that don't exist anymore. I do have a few Soviet Union coins for example, and I like to look at them and think of what it must have been like to live in the Soviet Union during its day.
Collector of Third Reich coins (1933 - 1946), and Australian coins.
Not swapping at this time.
sarikanair
Joined: 30-Nov-2017
Posts: 100
There are many collectors who like to collect coins which have a beautiful toning and lustre. I like collecting coins that have a historical significance.. They need not be rare coins, but the story behind the coin needs to be interesting.. that’s what fascinates me .. cheers!
Sjoelund
Joined: 28-Mar-2012
Posts: 2228
Hi,

I certainly like the next circulating I still don't have......

Ole
Globetrotter
Coin variants in English:
https://sites.google.com/site/coinvarietiescollection/home
In French on Cobra's site (not the same)
http://monnaiesetvarietes.esy.es/
Mitridat1974
Joined: 28-Aug-2016
Posts: 117
Quote: "sarikanair"​There are many collectors who like to collect coins which have a beautiful toning and lustre. I like collecting coins that have a historical significance.. They need not be rare coins, but the story behind the coin needs to be interesting.. that’s what fascinates me .. cheers!
​There are stories behind many coins. For example, yesterday I purchased a Spitsbergen coin of 100 rubles that has never circulated:
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces15754.html

It was minted for Russian miners working on that Norwegian archipelago, but it bore the legend "Russian Federation"on it, which outraged Norwegians and they banned its circulation.
That is only half the story, the other half is the reason why Russians minted that coin that turned out to be useless. It was actually a vestige of the socialist system of total state control where it was not enough to have money, the state actually regulated (directly or indirectly) where you spent it. There were "stores for everybody" and a complicated system of "special orders" for people with privileges. People working abroad earned special bonds (instead of regular rubles) to spend them on goods not available to regular customers paying in regular rubles.
While this system started to collapse after the free market economic reforms of 1992, it looks like the administration of the Russian mines on Spitsbergen wanted to keep that wicked system as long as possible (in particular, because it gave them more power over the employees).
My (still modest) collection:
https://en.numista.com/echanges/voir_collection.php?id=75443
besttext
Joined: 20-Jan-2019
Posts: 1
The following features regarding coins are attractive to me:
1) topic: fauna & flora, sports, famous people;
2) special insertions / additions, e.g. a hologram, a piece of clay, ceramics, flint, amber, rock-salt, etc.;
3) an interesting shape, e.g. a heart;
4) silver proof coins;
5) low-mintage coins with a low base-cost for investment purposes;
6) beautiful pictures - coins can be small masterpieces, similarly to stamps corresponding to wall pictures.

Have a great fun from finding and collecting your favorite coins!
medical translator from Poland, Best Text
MonaSeaclaid
Joined: 21-Jan-2016
Posts: 999
I love a coin with a story to tell. Otherwise I don't know what will catch my eye until I see it. I'm particularly drawn to old copper/brass/bronze coins though. And I love old Moroccan coins as well.

Value and metal content are rarely the first things I look at, but they can factor in as well.
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 212
These things

1. Countries I am interested in - New Zealand, Australia, GB, Pacific etc and also countries in which I ahve stamps of too.

2. Condition and state - Generally I love shiny and fault free coins, but realise with older and silver coins it is hard to get above very worn at times.

3. Size - yes I am a size queen, I prefer larger coins than fiddly little 3ds and 1 cent pieces. If its bigger than an old Florin I will want it.

4. Age - The older the better, even though my collection is mostly post 1900 and pre 1800 pieces can be counted on one finger.

5. Cost - If a coin is very cheap for what it is, or someone is selling it and not knowing what it is.
I love coins, both old and precious and also change coins. If its round and shiny, it will garner my interest. I also collect stamps and have an abiding interest in History, Archaeology,  and Social Issues.  I also worship the musical god Prince.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8000
Quote: "Moneytane"
​3. Size - yes I am a size queen, I prefer larger coins than fiddly little 3ds and 1 cent pieces. If its bigger than an old Florin I will want it.




I never considered that to be a factor in my collecting, but now that you bring it up, I am indeed attracted to crownsize coins (37-41mm diameter) more than say, shillings or florins. I suppose there's just more of them to love; the large size makes an appealing design all the more visible.
une franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
sjkrose
Joined: 2-Jan-2019
Posts: 6
Great question Kipsley...
I find myself collecting coins for historically purposes! I love history so collecting coins helps me better understand people places and major events. Of course meeting people with similar interest is always fun too!!!

Areas of Interest:
Early American coins 1650-1850
German coins from 1200-1700
British coins from 800-1800
Roman Emperors...
Any coins with a old provenance!

SJK
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 212
Quote: "CassTaylor"
Quote: "Moneytane"​​
​​3. Size - yes I am a size queen, I prefer larger coins than fiddly little 3ds and 1 cent pieces. If its bigger than an old Florin I will want it.
​​




​I never considered that to be a factor in my collecting, but now that you bring it up, I am indeed attracted to crownsize coins (37-41mm diameter) more than say, shillings or florins. I suppose there's just more of them to love; the large size makes an appealing design all the more visible.
​Agree totally, my favourite pieces as you see in my posts are huge silver crowns like my South African ones and large Silver 50 cents bits, the worn german 5 mark, mainly as its huge and before they were stolen, my collection of Morgan and Peace dollars gave me much delight.


HUGE AND GLEAMING - I WANT IT

Now I at least have the large Kiwi dollars and several of the polished specimen ones.

I also love Half crown/Half sized coins too (31mm or so).
I love coins, both old and precious and also change coins. If its round and shiny, it will garner my interest. I also collect stamps and have an abiding interest in History, Archaeology,  and Social Issues.  I also worship the musical god Prince.
gextyr
Joined: 18-Sep-2018
Posts: 5
My number one attraction to a coin is when it is related to an interesting person or event in history. For instance, the first "really expensive" coin I ever bought was a Queen Anne sixpence (this was many years ago when I considered a $200 coin expensive) - because it was minted while Isaac Newton was the master of the mint.

I also like finding interesting connections between coins as well, and will often follow "trails of interest". So, following in the "Isaac Newton" trail of interest, I just acquired a Hungarian denar from the late 1500s... not a rare or particularly beautiful coin - but it is from the reign of Rudolf II (HRE). The alchemist Sendivogius was active at court during Rudolf II's reign. Isaac Newton, famed for his interest in alchemy, is believed to have read the writings of Sendivogius. What I am really craving now is a counterfeit coin from the time when Newton was master of the mint - because apparently he was pretty ruthless about catching counterfeiters and having them executed. I am also always on the lookout for late Scottish silver coinage, since Newton lead their recoinage in the early 1700s after the Acts of Union, and much of of of the Scottish silver in circulation was melted down and recoined.

When I start down a road like that, it often leads to me attempting to build an entire set - such as "all English monarchs", or a Queen Anne type set. I have about 80 different "almost complete" sets, across various topics and interests ("lowest denomination from every modern country", "Lincoln head cents", "British monarchs", "complete US type set", "portraits of Alfonso XIII of Spain", "reign of Napoleon III", etc.)

I also occasionally buy a coin because I find it beautiful - although that is usually by exception. I purchased a BU 1/4 anna a few months ago just because I thought it was stunning. Still, I do love things like Panama Balboas, Mexico 1st Republic reales, and anything from Morocco.

Finally, I love oddball denominations. I don't collect much paper currency, but I do have a set of Burmese Kyats - because they come in 5, 10, 15, 45, and 90 kyat denominations. I also just bought a Jersey 1/13 Shilling for the same reason. I suppose the reason I like these so much is because there is usually an interesting historical reason for the strange denomination.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8000
Quote: "Moneytane"
​​Agree totally, my favourite pieces as you see in my posts are huge silver crowns like my South African ones and large Silver 50 cents bits, the worn german 5 mark, mainly as its huge and before they were stolen, my collection of Morgan and Peace dollars gave me much delight.


HUGE AND GLEAMING - I WANT IT

​Now I at least have the large Kiwi dollars and several of the polished specimen ones.

​I also love Half crown/Half sized coins too (31mm or so).
​Those New Zealand commemorative dollars I have a whole bunch of; I bought them mainly because they were really cheap, 2 or 3 euros apiece. Getting a huge coin (even a non-silver one) for that price was certainly an attractive proposition, at least to every coin collector's base instinct of "ooh shiny"!

Here's my own "huge and gleaming" proof NZ dollar:

I almost entered it into this year's MPCC silver proof until I remembered it wasn't silver. z|
une franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Reklaw
Joined: 12-Oct-2017
Posts: 100
One of the many things that attract me to silver coins is the size, if it's about shilling size then I'd like to acquire one as it's the compromise of size and it's spending power.
Ryurazu
Joined: 4-Jan-2019
Posts: 28
1. The intrinsic value to price (love a bargin :D)
2. The history of the coin even if they are old and worn copper
3. Variety and errors
4. SHINY

New Zealand commemorative dollars if they were silver that would have been a steal o.O still nice coins even tho not silver.

Sad to here that your collection was stolen Moneytane. Still you have some beauties.
neilithicman
Joined: 22-Nov-2017
Posts: 686
What I'm attracted to and what I buy are two different things.

I love coins that have a classical design, my favourites are coats of arms, royal crests, and classical depictions of humans such as the Panama Balboa, US walking liberty half, early 1900s Italian and Vatican coins and the 1940 Centenary half crown from New Zealand.

What I buy is: silver, bargain price

I only collect silver and I would never pay full catalogue value for a coin. Generally I buy bulk lots but occasionally I'll buy small groups or individual coins if they're a good price, like this pair that I picked up a day or so ago.

What? Me Worry
Kurt53
Joined: 19-Jul-2015
Posts: 161
I'm a rather eclectic collector, with several collections going on.
This one appealed to me because of the tone and lamination issue.

A smart man learns from his mistakes.  A smarter man learns from someone else's.
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 212
Quote: "Ryurazu"​1. The intrinsic value to price (love a bargin :D)
​2. The history of the coin even if they are old and worn copper
​3. Variety and errors
​4. SHINY

​New Zealand commemorative dollars if they were silver that would have been a steal o.O still nice coins even tho not silver.

​Sad to here that your collection was stolen Moneytane. Still you have some beauties.



​Thanks - it so funny people say that, as those Proof dollars were sold heavily here and many people bought them back in the 60s through to 80s as investment items. Dollars after 1976 are silver, but 76 and earlier are cupronickel - so very cheap.

Book value on them is about $10 - $30 a coin, but many of the original buyers are dying or getting rid of their coins and there is a glut of them on the market. I am a bit of a bottom feeder and buy them cheap. Realistically you can get a standard Uncirculated coin for about $2 NZ and a gleaming one for about $3 - 5. Bulk is cheaper and 1967, 69 and 74 coins are cheaper as mintages are higher. Other dates have lower mintages (Like Cass Taylors and My 1976 dollars) of 15 - 40k. Compared to the multi million mintages of most European and American coins, these are great buying at that rate.

If anything I have too many of them, every major buy brings in 3 or 4 sets of the 1967 and 1969 (Seriously I think everyone bought 1 or 5 - the disposable income was higher then, and NZ was a restricted and protected market - think British cars, no computers or net and restrictions on most things). Here's a proof set of 1976. All Cupronickel and it cost me about $4 - also a 1969 in case, now 50 years old and look at it.



Yet we pay much less now that what some one paid backin the day for this stuff. 1969 may go up as 2019 is the 250th anniversary of Cook's visit here (Its not PC to say "Discovered New Zealand" as Tasman was before him and then the Maoris.
I love coins, both old and precious and also change coins. If its round and shiny, it will garner my interest. I also collect stamps and have an abiding interest in History, Archaeology,  and Social Issues.  I also worship the musical god Prince.
HongKongCoinCollector
Joined: 27-Feb-2019
Posts: 17
For me, I collect international coins, antique and vintage coins from China, Hong Kong and Macao, and coins from communist countries.

When I collect international coins, I usually like collecting full sets of coins, i.e. all the different values of common coins that are currently legal tender in a country. For example, for a collection of the EU, say, I would have a 1 cent, 2 cent, 5 cent, 10 cent, 20 cent, 50 cent, 1 euro and 2 euro coin. For a collection of Singapore, I would include the 1 cent coin because it remains legal tender despite not currently being minted.

When I collect antique Chinese coins, I like their historic value. I aim for coins that are at least 50 years old. It really connects me to the past, and the political turmoil of past times.

And I have a weird obsession with communism. No, I don't truly believe in communist ideology, but I joke about it with my friends all the time.
Numismatists of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your forgeries!
;)
Often things turn up in unexpected places.
Keep looking! ;-)
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8000
Quote: "HongKongCoinCollector"​And I have a weird obsession with communism. No, I don't truly believe in communist ideology, but I joke about it with my friends all the time.
​Numismatists of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your forgeries!
;)
​Welcome to the site!
I can already tell I'm going to enjoy your sense of humour. :D
une franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Kurt53
Joined: 19-Jul-2015
Posts: 161
I have to confess that my interest in coins kindled a curiosity about Communism as well.
After a rather in depth investigation, I have to admit that it was far different from what I had been taught in school.
Never too old to learn.
A smart man learns from his mistakes.  A smarter man learns from someone else's.
Ariana33
Joined: 12-Mar-2019
Posts: 1
What attracts me is a coin that is beautiful and interesting to me. I love the ATB coins, I also just bought this one: https://bullionexchanges.com/1-gold-liberty-head-type-1-ex-jewlery-random-year. I love anything that is beautiful to look at (in my own opinion).

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