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Oldest dated coin by metal

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XRY-478
Joined: 1-Jan-2018
Posts: 143
Thought this might be an interesting thread which would fit in well with a few others like it that are floating around on the forum.

I myself unfortunately have no contributions to give as my knowledge only extends over a more modern period of coinage. However I am keen to hear what coins you can come up with.

I will list the obvious metal types I can think of but I am sure there will be some I have missed so please let me know and I will add them to the list.

Now just to to be clear I consider a coin to have no less then 50% purity to be considered as a definite metal type.

So here are the metals I have come up with so far.

Gold

silver

bronze

copper

aluminium

Nordic gold
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
A couple more precious metals for which I can provide the first answers:

Platinum:
1828, in the Russian Empire: https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces23166.html
There's a record of a 1820 British trial strike in platinum but it doesn't seem to be listed on Numista yet.

Palladium:
1966, by Sierra Leone: https://coins.www.collectors-society.com/WCM/CoinCustomSetView.aspx?s=3430
(also doesn't seem to be on Numista yet!) ;)
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 111
My guess is the oldest nickel coin would be the Swiss 20 Rappen of 1850?, even though the Americans may claim that 1866 dated nickels are the oldest.

The oldest cupronickel would be some of the low value Belgian coins of the 1860s.

Depends on dating systems too, there are ancient coins that can be dated solely by the ruler on them and if that is the case, Staters of Cyrus from the 520s BC would be the oldest. Many Hellenistic and Roman coins can be dated solely through the emperor and what appears on the Obverse (Judaea Capta 70AD, Britannia Sesterius 46AD etc)

I have heard of Arab silver dirhams and gold dinars dated as early as 42AH (663AD).

The earliest western dated coin in Arabic Numerals is that famous silver thaler or grosch of Bern or Basel dated 1484. Many European kingdoms, cities and principalities all started issuing coins with Arabioc dates in the late 15th and 16th centuries. Some 15th century "4s" look like ribbons, but the 5's in coins even dated like 1501 look like real 5's.

Generally Northern Europe adopted it quicker and Southern Europe was slow with most countries only dating coins after the 1550s. Spain used partial or no dates on some "cob' silver as late as the 1750s. It was not until about 1760 that "cobo de barra" or cob coins were fully replaced by milled coins. In 1732 most high values were milled, but some were not and often a doubloon comes up with numbers like "23" meaning 1723 for instance.

Earliest dated English coin is a series of Gold Ryals of Edward VI dated MDXLVIII (1548) and in Arabic Numerals, Silver Shilling, Half Crowns, and Crown dated 1551, although Universal dating only goes back to 1667 as some hammered coinage from the Elizabethan to early King Charles II era was undated. Most earlier English coins back to Saxon eras can be dated by Mintmarks on the to within 2 years in most cases.

Earliest North American dated coins would be 1652 Massachusetts leaf shillings.

In New Zealand our oldest coins are only 1933, so that is as early as they go for base silver and 1940 for bronze.

Australia's earliest dated "Coins" are 1813 Holey Dollars and Dumps, made out of Spanish silver dollars. Then its Adelaide pound patterns of 1852 and regular Gold coinage from 1853 to 1929. their earliest own coins are 1910 for silver and 1911 for bronze.
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 111
1499 Groschen from Basel with the ribbon style 4
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces114345.html

And this 1492 Dicken has the standard numeral 4, you can see how its evolved from the ribbon 4
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces101471.html

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces101467.html Very silmilar to the 1484 coin, but there is not an image of the coin on Numista.

Generally for silver the Swiss Cantons throw up many of these early dated pieces.

After 1518 there was an explosion in large silver coins through Central Europe and Germany with the discovery of mass silver deposits at Joachimsthal, Czechia - Thal is where Thaler comes from and the word Dollar is descended from Thaler, meaning of the valley in German.

Around the same time, the Spanish were expoliting masses of Gold and Silver in the Americas and large silver coins came out of their treasuries and mints in America and Spain.
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Quote: "Moneytane"​Around the same time, the Spanish were expoliting masses of Gold and Silver in the Americas and large silver coins came out of their treasuries and mints in America and Spain.
​I should add that the Spanish Main contained one of the greatest natural supplies of platinum of the time; but in 1735, fearing it could be used to make counterfeit gold coins (it was), a royal decree ordered all of Spain's supply of platinum dumped into the sea. Talk about lack of hindsight (although at least they didn't import so much of that that they devalued the European value of the metal like they did with gold and silver)! :°

For Aluminium:
The metal itself wasn't discovered until 1824, and at one point it was such a novelty that the wealthy would dine off aluminium plates instead of silverware (didn't age too well!). It took until the end of the 19th century for it to become a feasible coinage metal, and an 1883 pattern 5 francs for Madagascar made by the Monnaie de Paris exists: https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces79827.html

But the earliest circulating coins are the British East Africa issues from 1907:
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces33342.html
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
apuking
Joined: 31-Oct-2012
Posts: 4993
Thanks guys all vey interesting.

Here also a German coin dated 1494 https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces135574.html some others might also bear a date from around this time.
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Choucas
Joined: 21-Jun-2017
Posts: 1474
There are dated european coins from the 13th century.
An example of a dated 1405 silver coin :
https://www.ma-shops.com/laurensschulman/item.php?id=4446&lang=en

But I know for sure there are earlier...
There is a book
https://www.amazon.com/Early-Dated-Coins-Europe-1234-1500/dp/0871846004
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
I remember that 1234 Danish coin! It's going to be interesting to see who gets the crown for earliest dated gold and silver; my guess is on one of those Islamic caliphate coins.

And here's an interesting addition to the list; Antimony!
It was used for a 10 cents (1 Jiao) coin for Guizhou province, China in 1931:
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces42344.html
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 111
Quote: "Choucas"​There are dated european coins from the 13th century.
​An example of a dated 1405 silver coin :
https://www.ma-shops.com/laurensschulman/item.php?id=4446&lang=en

​But I know for sure there are earlier...
​There is a book
https://www.amazon.com/Early-Dated-Coins-Europe-1234-1500/dp/0871846004
​Cool, I got confused as I thought they meant the date was in AD and in Arabic Numerals rather than Roman. I agree Roman dated coins going back into the Medieval era.

Not dated, but a special coin that comes to mind is the Agnus Dei penny of Ethelred the Unready, it is believed this coin came out in AD 1000 to commemorate the millenium!
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince
neilithicman
Joined: 22-Nov-2017
Posts: 646
How about

Nickel
Tin
Lead
Iron
Zinc
What? Me Worry
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Quote: "neilithicman"​How about

Nickel
​Tin
​Lead
​Iron
​Zinc
​I'll take Nickel; the first "pure" nickel coin appears to be the Swiss 20 Rappen coin first issued in 1881 (and it's still going, even though its composition changed a couple of times since).

(American 5 cent coins, despite being called commonly called "nickels", are actually CuNi, being only 25% nickel, an alloy that has been used since 1866)
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Holindaze
Joined: 14-Jul-2014
Posts: 109
Verry good question, Ill let the more intelligent members answer this one.

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