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Coins that had very short issue times

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COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615
On a recent forum, that seems to be still ongoing, the coin mentioned several times, was the GB cartwheel 1d and 2d from 1797.
These coins, due to weight, were only issued for one year.
My question is therefore:- How many other coins have had a very limited issue time. Commemoratives are not allowed, as there would obviously be thousands.
Photographs would be greatly appreciated, and reason for short issue time.
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
jokinen
Joined: 10-Feb-2013
Posts: 1677
Here's a not so rare example of a French 10 Francs from 1986 demonetised in early 1987:

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces297.html

The coins were confused with 1/2 Franc coins. As a result these were replaced by bi-metallic 10 Franc coins quickly after.
January First-of-May
Joined: 10-Apr-2016
Posts: 642
The first example that comes to my mind is the 1994 Yugoslav 1 dinar: https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces9941.html

The currency it was made in, YUG, the January 1994 dinar, was introduced on January 1, 1994; however, extreme hyperinflation resulted in a new currency (novi dinar, YUM) getting introduced only 23 days later.
Only this one type was ever made for the January 1994 dinar, and the coins probably became worthless within days; I have no idea whether any of them actually managed to circulate.

The previous type, the October 1993 dinar (YOU), which lasted for three months, actually provided an entire series of coins, for a total of seven types; six of those types are extremely common, and correspondingly very cheap, but the 500 dinara coin had apparently never made it to circulation, and examples of it sell for $20 or so if you can find any.

By the way, that French coin is pretty neat! I should probably try to get one...
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615
I have most of the Yugoslavian coins, but like you stated, the 500 Dinars still eludes my collection.
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
ALLRED1950
Joined: 2-Jul-2012
Posts: 4084
Austria has some odd ones for there beginning. Austria Krone 1923 to 1924. There is a 200 Krone only issued for 1924. And a 1000 Krone only issued for 1924.
But the really odd ones are the Austria 100 krone Km 2831, issued for 1923 and 1924, in gold, at 33.88 g. And the 100 krone Km 2832 , issued for the same years,1924 and 1925. But in bronze, 1.67g. A gold and bronze coins issued the same years that have the same value. I think someone was playing a big game. I have always wanted to know the story behind that one.
AT THIS TIME IAM NO LONGER SWAPPING. I need too put things in order. And take some time off. Thank you yours daryl
Mr. Midnight
Joined: 10-Mar-2017
Posts: 720
A few of my favorites that come to mind -

The Saar franken coins were all one year only, because the Saarland ceased to exist as an inependant entity after just a couple of years.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/sarre-1.html

Syria and Lebanon got a 10quirsh piece in 1929 only, though the 25 and 50 quirsh were issued through 1936
I dont know why the 10 was not continued. it is a very small coin.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces11266.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces11260.html

Monaco had several one year only coins in the mid 20th century
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces804.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces2811.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1873.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces803.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces2225.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces3810.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces4924.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces5132.html
because a little country like Monaco would not need new coins every year, and the inflation was so severe, the coinage kept changing, so by the time they would need new coins the denominations needed another zero added.

This Monaco coin a 50 centime bronze was replaced with a 1/2 franc in nickel after only one year
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces3965.html
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
Mr. Midnight
Joined: 10-Mar-2017
Posts: 720
hypre-inflation I think has produced many many of these, as the Yugoslav example above.
Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina could have some examples.
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
jimpop
Joined: 26-Jan-2013
Posts: 777
Quote: "COINMAN1"​On a recent forum, that seems to be still ongoing, the coin mentioned several times, was the GB cartwheel 1d and 2d from 1797.
​These coins, due to weight, were only issued for one year.
​My question is therefore:- How many other coins have had a very limited issue time. Commemoratives are not allowed, as there would obviously be thousands.
​Photographs would be greatly appreciated, and reason for short issue time.
​they were actually made and issued for several years, but they kept the 1797 date
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615
jimpop,
you learn something new everyday. I never realised it was issued in following years.

That sort of information should be added to the coin sheet
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
Choucas
Joined: 21-Jun-2017
Posts: 1474
These coins from Belgium were only issued in 1901. However, I don't know if there are actual reasons for this.
https://fr.numista.com/catalogue/pieces286.html
https://fr.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1305.html

Another one that comes to my mind is this one, the 4 reichspfennig from 1932 :
https://fr.numista.com/catalogue/pieces8463.html

Also, this 25 centimes from France 1903 :
https://fr.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1160.html
Also some issues in 1904 but only is ESSAI (trial).

The 5 francs Petain from 1941 (quite rare) :
https://fr.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1191.html

And the 5 francs Bazor from 1933 :
https://fr.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1188.html
Holindaze
Joined: 14-Jul-2014
Posts: 109
Are you including the coins that had a short run because of the removal of silver from circulating coins then the American 1964 Kennedy Half and the 1966 Australian 50 cent piece could be included. What about wartime coins such as the American war nickels as well as a lot of European coins issued with zinc or aluminum to save more valuable metals for the war ? Or coins made with mistakes such as the 1911 pig rupee from India or the 1911 dime w/o "DEI GRATIA"
Finland had two coins the 25 penna and 50 penna coins issued that looked a lot like the ones issued before except for the fact there is no crown between the two eagles to show that the Russian czar was no longer in control of the land.
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615
Any stories of any short lived coin, for whatever reason can be mentioned, as someone will surely be interested in that particular coin.
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Very interesting thread! Allow me to contribute a few stories:

I'm thinking primarily of coins that were only issued for a few years because they were very easily confused or passed off as other coins, like the 10 francs Jimenez already mentioned above; examples I can think of include:

1887 UK "Jubilee Bust" 6 pence (easily confused for the half sovereign)
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces4722.html
1875-78 USA "Seated Liberty" 20 cents (easily confused for the quarter)
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces18403.html
1902-03 Italy "Aquila Araldica" 25 centesimi (easily confused for the 20 centesimi)
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces7231.html
(I'm sure there are more! :° Many of these seem to stem from indecision over whether to use a .20 or .25 denomination.)

Other short-lived coins for whatever reason include:
1816-17 UK "Bull head" half-crown; the only post-1816 Great Recoinage coin with this bust of George III, the blind, increasingly senile king reportedly hated it. https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces13168.html

1866-68 Hong Kong 1 Dollar and 1/2 Dollar; the Chinese merchants in Canton were suspicious of these new big silver coins, having become accustomed to using the Spanish/Mexican 8 reales coin over the past centuries, so the British discontinued them in 1868 and the minting equipment was sold to Japan.

1918 R Italian Eritrea 1 Tallero/5 Lire; this was an attempt by Italian colonial authorities to replace the popular Maria Theresa thalers (as you can see by the imitation of the Fat Lady Dollar's design) in circulation in East Africa with a coin whose supply could be controlled by the Italian government; much like the Hong Kong dollar above, this endeavour failed because of lack of confidence from local traders.
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
neilithicman
Joined: 22-Nov-2017
Posts: 646
I thought the cartwheels were issued over a few years with a frozen date?

The New Zealand coins issued in 1947 were a single year issue. In 1947 threepence, sixpence, shilling, florin and half crown coins were changed from 50% silver to cupro-nickel. But during 1947 India achieved independence and so from 1948 onwards the inscription on coins changed from "George VI King Emperor" to "King George VI"

Fiji has a 2 year run on their silver coins in 1942 and 1943. Until then the Fijian coins were struck in England on the 50% silver planchets that were also used for the New Zealand coins, but during world war 2 it was too dangerous to ship coins from the UK and so the coins were instead struck on 90% silver planchets in the San Francisco mint in the USA and shipped from there.
What? Me Worry
Holindaze
Joined: 14-Jul-2014
Posts: 109
Another example that has been seen on different topics is the 1883 no cents Liberty nickel but two of my favorites are the Latvia 5 lats coin and the 1 ruble coin from Soviet Republic (RSFSR)
radrick007
Joined: 7-Feb-2011
Posts: 2100
Quote: "COINMAN1"​jimpop,
​you learn something new everyday. I never realised it was issued in following years.

​That sort of information should be added to the coin sheet
​"Ask and ye shall receive" :D Here is a link to the newly-updated Cartwheel penny listing.
Just because you can't see it ... doesn't mean it isn't there - Anon

Catalogue referee for Celtic Britain, England & United Kingdom
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615
radrick007,
I applaud you sir, for your very quick reaction to my question. These things do not usually happen, so am very glad to see this in the listing.
Teamwork always brings results.
Really enjoying this forum sheet. Long may it continue
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Quote: "neilithicman"​The New Zealand coins issued in 1947 were a single year issue. In 1947 threepence, sixpence, shilling, florin and half crown coins were changed from 50% silver to cupro-nickel. But during 1947 India achieved independence and so from 1948 onwards the inscription on coins changed from "George VI King Emperor" to "King George VI"


​Same story in the UK; in 1947 the composition also changed from .500 silver to CuNi, and the 1947-48 two year issue has the IND:IMP (meaning Indiæ Imperator, or Emperor of India) legend. It took until 1949 for the Royal Mint to start issuing British coins without the now obsolete imperial title.

In a different vein, there's also the stories of coins issued due to short-lived political arrangements; my favourite is this issue of a 5 francs coin (and this 20 francs) in 1814-15 bearing the portrait of Louis XVIII, who had spent the last twenty years as "King" of France in exile (Louis XVII was the uncrowned son of Louis XVI, who died in 1795 in prison). Napoleon abdicated in May 1814, and the "fat pig" (as Napoleon called him) returned to Paris on the bayonets of the Sixth Coalition.

More interestingly, in 1815 (after Napoleon's second defeat at Waterloo), some gold 20 franc coins were struck by the Royal Mint (R mintmark) in June 1815 and reached France via British troops stationed in Flanders, but they were declared counterfeit by French authorities, since their creation had not been authorised by them. They were withdrawn gradually and much of the supply was destroyed. :(

Other short-lived French types due to political regime include:

the 1815 "Hundred Days" Napoleonic issues (the inverse of those "First Restoration" Louis XVIII coins mentioned above), minted during the final period of Napoleon's reign.

All coins minted under the Second Republic (1848-52); this brief republic saw its first and only elected president, Napoleon's nephew, crown himself emperor after a coup d'état in 1851.

This provisional type, created during the Franco-Prussian War, by muling a July Monarchy 5 Francs reverse die with the Ceres obverse created in 1848 (to represent the Government of National Defence, and later the Third Republic).

the 1944 2 Francs minted at Philadelphia, to be carried into southern France via Allied forces in Operation Dragoon (since they were made with funds from the treasury of the Provisional Government of the French Republic rather than by a AMGOT (Allied Military Govt. of Occupied Territories), they proved more popular than the AM franc banknotes, which many like Charles de Gaulle feared to be an attempt by the US to make France into a post-war economic satellite). http://www.monnaie-magazine.com/lhistoire-de-la-piece-de-2-francs-philadelphie/
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
Choucas
Joined: 21-Jun-2017
Posts: 1474
Oh, and there is also the belgian 1944 2 francs, which was also minted at Philadelphia, for quite the same reasons that Cass explained for the french 2 francs.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces3103.html
Mr. Midnight
Joined: 10-Mar-2017
Posts: 720
I found an example from Mexico. In the 80s inflation was raging in Mexico, in 1983 a new, small, 50 centavo coin was minted
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces3906.html
but 50c. was already worth almost nothing and it was the last 50c. coin of the old Peso.
Within three years there were 100, 500 and 1000Peso coins, each minted for two or three years only, and in 1992 all were scrapped and a new peso was introduced.
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
pnightingale
Joined: 27-Jul-2011
Posts: 5163
Great Britain issued the Double Florin from 1887 - 1890. It's a very easy series to complete consisting of only five coins if you include both 1887 types and none of them are particularity expensive or hard to find. I have the 1887 Arabic type (shown below) and the 1889 in acceptable grades, perhaps it's time to start looking to fill those gaps.



They were never popular, especially with shopkeepers because of their similarity to the long established Crown. There was no commercial demand for the coin and it's true to say that Double Florins were a solution in search of a problem. They were not officially demonetized, production simply stopped in 1890 and never resumed. With the introduction of decimal currency in 1971 the opportunity to take a second bite at the demonetization cherry was once again missed and they remain legal tender today with a face value of 20p.
Non illegitimis carborundum est.  Excellent advice for all coins.
Supreme Ruler and Dictator for Life of the 6th Avenue Coin, Stamp  & Rice Puller Club. President, Boss & Top Dawg for Hutt River.
ZacUK Numista team, Moderator
Joined: 3-Jan-2011
Posts: 6112
Those double florins (4 shillings) were nicknamed the 'barmaids ruin' as yes they were confused with the crown (5 shillings) coin, so a barmaid would give an extra shilling in change, and any shortfall in the till would have come out of her pocket.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces11098.html

Another short-lived UK coin was the 'Godless' florin - which yes the coin still continued to be issued afterwards but with a modified lettering, as Dei Gratia (shortened to D G) was omitted, causing public outcry.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces12805.html old 1848 and 1849
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces4840.html new 1851 to 1887

A recent short-lived coin was the decimal half penny, which was always intended to be not long in circulation. The shilling became 5 new pence, so the sixpence became 2.5 new pence; so when converted to the new currency a 2 pence also needed a half penny to make up the equivalent in old money - at the time when shops could temporarily accept old or new coins.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces856.html 1971 to 1981
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces6899.html 1982 to 1984
My collections >
http://mycoinssite.webs.com/apps/photos/album?albumid=13560800
also 13750057 also 15924495 also 15995337
http://mycoinssite.webs.com/apps/photos/album?albumid=16060326
neilithicman
Joined: 22-Nov-2017
Posts: 646
Fiji also had a 1 year issue penny, I'll just post a picture and that will give you the explanation as to why it was only issued for 1 year

What? Me Worry
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615
Yes. Edward VIII.
Sadly, I do not have one of these.
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
ALLRED1950
Joined: 2-Jul-2012
Posts: 4084
Oh iam late . Neil like this British West Africa

But here is a Fiji 1/2 cent issued only one year. have a whole roll of them
AT THIS TIME IAM NO LONGER SWAPPING. I need too put things in order. And take some time off. Thank you yours daryl
ALLRED1950
Joined: 2-Jul-2012
Posts: 4084
Here is a US 1 cent issued part of a year


and the 1943 war 1 cent was issued one year.
AT THIS TIME IAM NO LONGER SWAPPING. I need too put things in order. And take some time off. Thank you yours daryl
neilithicman
Joined: 22-Nov-2017
Posts: 646
Quote: "ALLRED1950"​ Oh iam late . Neil like this British West Africa

​But here is a Fiji 1/2 cent issued only one year. have a whole roll of them
​Yes, two of just a handful of coins issued for Edward VIII before he abdicated. I've had quite a few of those 1954 halfpennies come through my hands over the years, They're cool little coins.
What? Me Worry
cmaclean
Joined: 12-Oct-2014
Posts: 318
Quote: "radrick007"
Quote: "COINMAN1"​jimpop,
​​you learn something new everyday. I never realised it was issued in following years.
​​
​​That sort of information should be added to the coin sheet
​​"Ask and ye shall receive" :D Here is a link to the newly-updated Cartwheel penny listing.
Wiki says they minted them up to 1799, but I'm sure I read somewhere else that they continued into 1800. I'll pass the details on if I can find the 1800 date claim.​
Numista referee for Scotland.
January First-of-May
Joined: 10-Apr-2016
Posts: 642
Quote: "Choucas"​Oh, and there is also the belgian 1944 2 francs, which was also minted at Philadelphia, for quite the same reasons that Cass explained for the french 2 francs.
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces3103.html
​Minted, as it happens, on leftover 1943 steel cent planchets after that short-lived type didn't work out.
neilithicman
Joined: 22-Nov-2017
Posts: 646
A whole slew of coins with short issue times were the various occupation coins issued during WWI and WWII. The make an interesting area of collecting by themselves (I attempted a collection myself at one stage but got frustrated with the lack of them in New Zealand). They were of course discontinued when the countries were liberated after the war.

Most of the coins were issued in zinc as it was cheap and not needed for the war effort like copper and nickel were. Some of them have nice designs too, I'm quite fond of the Belgian WWI coins.

What? Me Worry
JustforFun
Joined: 14-Jun-2014
Posts: 1080
The following 3 coins lasted less than 2 years... but in reality they were rarely seem or used,

Venezuela 10 Bolivares Fuertes 2016
Venezuela 50 Bolivares Fuertes 2016
Venezuela 100 Bolivares Fuertes 2016

Then at the end of 2018 these new set of coins were issued (due to devaluation a new currency was issued)
Venezuela 50 Centimos (Bolivar Soberano) 2018
Venezuela 1 Bolivar (Bolivar Soberaro) 2018

Lets see how long these last two will last, barely used as of today, with a super high inflation a washer its more expensive than any of these coins...

This is a washer.... just in case someone does not know :O
JustforFun...
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Quote: "January First-of-May"
Quote: "Choucas"​Oh, and there is also the belgian 1944 2 francs, which was also minted at Philadelphia, for quite the same reasons that Cass explained for the french 2 francs.
​​https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces3103.html
​​Minted, as it happens, on leftover 1943 steel cent planchets after that short-lived type didn't work out.
I'm actually fairly surprised at the existence of those two 2 franc coins, with the political reasons they (at least the French one) was issued! Towards the end of WWII most provisional currency was issued in the form of notes (e.g. the 1-10 lire notes issued in 1944 during the Lieutenancy in Italy, as well as the AMGOT banknotes (AM Franc, Lira, Mark, Schilling, and Yen). ​
une Franglaise; ♪ je brosse ma chevelure ♫
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1615


Found these two in my collection

St. Pierre & Miquelon 1 Franc & 2 Francs dates 1948. KM#1 & KM#2

Seems to have been the only 2 coins every issued except coins with Essais & Piedforts with Essais, although, I have never seen any of these essais

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces6008.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces1288.html
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
Mr. Midnight
Joined: 10-Mar-2017
Posts: 720
That reminds me of these -


Most of these are one year only types, all minted in Paris on common planchets
Forgive me for not citing all the Numista pages, but here is the one for Fr. Somaliland
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces5162.html
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Quote: "Mr. Midnight"






​The St Pierre & Miquelon coins' one year issue can be explained by the islands' tiny population, but for those African issues, their story is rooted in some pretty interesting history. ;)

France was the most reluctant of the modern European colonial powers to give up its colonial empire, especially its African colonies; it took until 1946 and the creation of the "Union Française" for rights like voting and representation to be extended to France's colonial subjects (basically everyone living in French territory outside of metropolitan France and parts of Algeria and Senegal).

The inauguration of this new "French Union" (where there was only one France that just happened to be spread territorially over six continents, as opposed to the previous arrangement where metropolitan France ruled over its overseas colonies) gave at least the semblance of equality for the colonial subjects with citizens of metropolitan France.

This measure came too little too late, however, and the acceleration of decolonisation marched on. So when the Fourth Republic collapsed into crisis in 1958, the French Union went with it, and the new Fifth Republic set up a new system called the Communauté Française (French Community), where France abandoned the assimilation promoted by the French Union, and adopted a new policy of autonomous self-governance for its overseas territories.

This was short lived, as just one year later several member states demanded and were granted full sovereign independence, and by 1962 France had lost all of its territory on mainland Africa except modern day Djibouti. Many retained economic and political ties to France in the form of the CFA franc and the Francophonie association, but they were now in all sense of the word, independent.

Most of those coins were minted in the confused period in the 1950s and early 1960s when it wasn't sure which direction the French colonies would take in the future; whether they would be assimilated into a French Union, or be autonomous regions within the French Community, or be fully independent altogether. (Guinea took the maverick route and voted straight for independence instead of for joining the Community in 1958, which is why it has its own Franc instead of the CFA Franc and became independent eighteen months before the rest in March 1960).
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Camerinvs
Joined: 19-May-2016
Posts: 2430
The Canadian 20¢ is a one-year type issued only in 1858 ─ or rather struck only in 1858 because they were released over several years.

The 20¢ were meant to be equivalent to the British shilling, but the US quarter was so much more common here that the 20¢ were a source of confusion because of the similar size. When Canada needed to issue new coins in 1870 they moved to a 25¢ coin. Not infrequently you see for sale a Canadian or New Brunswick 20¢ whose denomination was badly scratched. This is because dishonest people tried to pass them for quarters.

Prince Edward Island had time to strike only a 1¢ coin in 1871 before they joined Confederation in 1873.

As for washers, there used to be at least one in the catalogue, now removed, but we still have slugs and machine-made metal discs that are rather embarrassing to see in a numismatic site. There are quite a few links to such things in this older post.
I free coins from their holders and good wines from their bottles.
Oklahoman
Joined: 20-Dec-2015
Posts: 1620
Those Yugoslavian 1993 500s were the dickens to find. Even my friend in Yugoslavia at the time couldnt find me any.
Mr. Midnight
Joined: 10-Mar-2017
Posts: 720
since we are including war-time issues struck on low value materials, I will put in these brass Cuban centavo coins, otherwise struck on copper-nickel.


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces10228.html
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces7269.html
Jamais l'or n'a perdu la plus petite occasion de se montrer stupide. -Balzac
Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 111
Staying in France

I have a 1963 50 centimes in brass like the same style of the 5, 10 and 20c of that era.

This coin was only issued for 3 years before it was replaced by the much smaller nickel ½ franc piece.
I have no ide why as the amount of brass used in it was only marginally more than the 20 cents. Maybe by 1963 50 centimes was either too worthless, or 4 low value brass coins was too many.

The other guess is that 1960 - 1964 saw the issue of aluminium 1 and 5 centimes and at some stage the 1c was discontinued being worthless and the 5c became a brass coin.

Tonga issued 2 sets of coins in 1967, one set from 1 seniti to 1 Pa'anga had Queen Salote on the Reverse and she had died in 1965. The others had had the coronation of Obverse of King Taufa' ahau. In 1968 both types disappeared for a standard Taufa 'ahau obverse.

Samoa and Tonga both updated their reverse designs in 1972 from shields and stars to coins showing fruit (Samoa) and Animals (Tonga).

The current sets of Tonga (2016 seniti values/ 2015 pa'anga) and Samoa 2011 set of 10 sene to 2 tala seem to be one year only, but it is possibly that they do not need more coins just yet being small countries with a small population (Barely 100k each).
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 7384
Quote: "Moneytane"​This coin was only issued for 3 years before it was replaced by the much smaller nickel ½ franc piece.
​I have no ide why as the amount of brass used in it was only marginally more than the 20 cents. Maybe by 1963 50 centimes was either too worthless, or 4 low value brass coins was too many.


​My line of reasoning for that 1/2 franc coin has nothing to do with practicality, but everything to do with sentimentality. The early 1960s were a tumultuous time for France; the loss of the colonial empire, the war of independence in Algeria, the new 5th Republic (established 1958) and the revaluation of the Franc (100 old francs = 1 NF) were all things that rocked French society.

So many of the 5th Republic's coins, issued in the early 1960s were deliberately designed to evoke continuity with the old pre-WWI Franc Germinal coinage, both dimensionally and aesthetically, and appeal to older generations' nostalgia; the 1 Franc and later 1/2 Franc "Semeuse" is obviously a CuNi iteration of the silver 1897-1920 issues by Roty. The same goes for the silver 10 Francs issued in 1964 (originally intended to circulate), identical to the 5 Francs "Hercule" last issued in 1889 (other than denomination).

Here's a short documentary about the nouveau franc produced by the Monnaie de Paris around 1965 about the new coinage. <:D
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Moneytane
Joined: 28-Jan-2014
Posts: 111
Quote: "neilithicman"​Fiji also had a 1 year issue penny, I'll just post a picture and that will give you the explanation as to why it was only issued for 1 year

​There are also holey coins of KE8 for Papua New Guinea and British West Africa

They are cool little coins and the shape was kept between 1934 and 1968 for Fijian Penny and Half Penny. They also issued Brass ones of these in 1942 and 1943 (Of course under King George VI)

Also 1936 coins for Fiji were issued with George V King Emperor as well.
I love change coins and old coins, but my main focus is stamp collecting and the Muscial God - Prince

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