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Coin or note ?

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doc_man
Joined: 9-Mar-2011
Posts: 1087
Hi,
check this out :
https://www.mdm-wholesale.com/single-products/7-wonders-of-the-world/
Is it a coin in shape and desgin of note ?
Regards,
Damian
Numista referee for East Africa, British West Africa, Benin, Biafra, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dahomey, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Liberia, Mombasa, Poland, Congo - Democratic Republic, Ruanda-Urundi, Senegal, Chad, Zaire, Zambia
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1776
Reading the information on the link, I would say, due to its size, it's a banknote.
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
doc_man
Joined: 9-Mar-2011
Posts: 1087
They write its a coin note.
Numista referee for East Africa, British West Africa, Benin, Biafra, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dahomey, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Liberia, Mombasa, Poland, Congo - Democratic Republic, Ruanda-Urundi, Senegal, Chad, Zaire, Zambia
Salaction
Joined: 2-Apr-2017
Posts: 361
Coin Note has it's own definition.

So the topic question is invalid.


What material is that one made from? I see gold, but can be paper gold too, right?
arvin11
Joined: 31-Mar-2017
Posts: 300
Quote: "doc_man"​They write its a coin note.
​Because its a note made of metal -- so Coin note :D
coin collector.....
doc_man
Joined: 9-Mar-2011
Posts: 1087
Quote: "Salaction"​Coin Note has it's own definition.

​So the topic question is invalid.


​What material is that one made from? I see gold, but can be paper gold too, right?
​True, but it was just to make your attention :)
Numista referee for East Africa, British West Africa, Benin, Biafra, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dahomey, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Liberia, Mombasa, Poland, Congo - Democratic Republic, Ruanda-Urundi, Senegal, Chad, Zaire, Zambia
CassTaylor
Joined: 30-May-2014
Posts: 8447
Quote: "Salaction"​Coin Note has it's own definition.

​So the topic question is invalid.


​What material is that one made from? I see gold, but can be paper gold too, right?
​The ambiguity here is kinda the selling point, so there's probably little point in trying to classify it as either. :8D

And yes, gold is very malleable, so it can be hammered until it's very thin- I think that's the deal here.
https://www.instagram.com/sophie_numismatique/
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 769
Quote: "CassTaylor"
Quote​And yes, gold is very malleable, so it can be hammered until it's very thin- I think that's the deal here.
​According to one source, an ounce of gold can be hammered thin enough to cover 96.9 square feet!

http://omgfactcheck.tumblr.com/post/371802581/a-lump-of-pure-gold-the-size-of-a-matchbox-can-be
halfdisme
Joined: 6-Oct-2017
Posts: 769
Gold and silver banknotes, as such, are nothing new. I have a set of gold and silver banknotes issued by Antigua and Barbuda in 1998.
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1776
So, reading all of the above, will these items be allowed on Numista, or a banknote website, or both?
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
Choucas Numista team
Joined: 21-Jun-2017
Posts: 1948
I'd consider this as a note, not a coin.
Traducteur catalogue : n'hésitez pas à me demander de traduire une fiche.
Catalog translator : feel free to ask me to translate a page.
yvon
Joined: 9-Jun-2017
Posts: 431
In my opinion it is not a coin and not a note too, but a beautifull piece of art.
...you can run,  but you can't hide...
DecimalHunter
Joined: 22-Jan-2019
Posts: 66
It looks to me like neither but a waste of gold. They say legal tender but would it circulate?
COINMAN1
Joined: 8-Jun-2013
Posts: 1776
It does not have to circulate to be legal tender. There are thousands of coins dedicated as NCLT, (non circulating legal tender), and they are perfectly accepted in the numismatic society.
I'm just a collector of coins, not a slave to it, unless I am in a coin shop.
ciscoins
Joined: 6-Apr-2013
Posts: 260
Quote: "COINMAN1"​It does not have to circulate to be legal tender. There are thousands of coins dedicated as NCLT, (non circulating legal tender), and they are perfectly accepted in the numismatic society.
​They are accepted by coin dealers and some collectors, not by the whole society. "Legal tender" in the descriptions of these pieces means that the piece (coin, note) will be accepted by the central bank for the face value, but it doesn't mean that the central bank will give you this piece for the same face value. It will sell this object to you for a price much much higher. So the bank wants to get something for 10 dollars (face value) and then sell it for 1000 dollars (real price of the metal). All this "legal tender" concept seems to be a big fraud for naive collectors.
http://ciscoins.net/ - Coins of CIS and Baltic Countries, Coins of Central and South America
yvon
Joined: 9-Jun-2017
Posts: 431
Quote: "ciscoins"
Quote: "COINMAN1"​It does not have to circulate to be legal tender. There are thousands of coins dedicated as NCLT, (non circulating legal tender), and they are perfectly accepted in the numismatic society.
​​They are accepted by coin dealers and some collectors, not by the whole society. "Legal tender" in the descriptions of these pieces means that the piece (coin, note) will be accepted by the central bank for the face value, but it doesn't mean that the central bank will give you this piece for the same face value. It will sell this object to you for a price much much higher. So the bank wants to get something for 10 dollars (face value) and then sell it for 1000 dollars (real price of the metal). All this "legal tender" concept seems to be a big fraud for naive collectors.
​100% agree. Try to buy something small on a local market, in a country who issues this kind of
'legal-tender'-coins. If you are not lucky, they will call the police up on you...
...you can run,  but you can't hide...

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