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15,000 coins

15,000 coins

Numista reached the 15,000 coin step. It is now one of the largest on-line catalogs of world coins!
This has been achieved thanks to the numerous members of Numista who contribute to enrich the catalog.

Tibetan coinThe (almost) 15,000th coin in the catalog is this silver rupee from Tibet, struck in the early 20th century (Y# 3).
It's interesting to notice that these coins were sometimes cut into 2 or 4 parts for use as small change.

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kommodore
Joined: 5-Nov-2009
Posts: 2764
From june i predicted 1 year to get from 10000 to 20000 coins...so now half year later we're half our way from my prediction.
HELLO FROM ROMANIA!
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
Well, I don't mean to brag, but...

...I uploaded that Tibetian coin!

Thank you, Numista, for being the best online Numismatic website!

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

montysghost
Joined: 28-Jul-2010
Posts: 39
Why stop at 20,000

If it continues to grow as it has, there will be more listings then KRAUSE!
Hey how about a new coin reference database instead of KM numbers we could have NM numbers :O
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
Quote: montysghostHey how about a new coin reference database instead of KM numbers we could have NM numbers :O
That's a really interesting comment, montysghost. The Krause catalogue only covers coins dated 1500+, and some have FR#s, which aren't really KM. And sometimes the Krause team doesn't notice a coin issued. Coins issued in 2000 and have been forgotten, for example, could have a KM# for coins in 2010. But everyone uses KM#s. If Numista gets better than Krause, meaning we have hundreds of thousands of entries with all measurements and crap, with all high quality photos, we can dominate the original.

But let's just focus on adding new entries.

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

montysghost
Joined: 28-Jul-2010
Posts: 39
Today Krause, tomorrow the World X-D
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
Heh. Nice.

It's part of being a Japanese Numista admin to not... you know... do that. But, seriously, a NM would be nice. Everyone would be using them.

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

kommodore
Joined: 5-Nov-2009
Posts: 2764
Not yet...:D
Hello Japan!
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
Yes, yes, hello Japan!

Not yet indeed. Seriously, though, we can dominate all numsimatic sites if we work twice as hard. I've done my part, we've done some of ours. It's nice.

I'm kinda worried about tokens though. I don't mind them sitting there, but it's degrading to have them here.

Whatever.

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

kommodore
Joined: 5-Nov-2009
Posts: 2764
Quote: SmartOneKgYes, yes, hello Japan!

Not yet indeed. Seriously, though, we can dominate all numsimatic sites if we work twice as hard. I've done my part, we've done some of ours. It's nice.

I'm kinda worried about tokens though. I don't mind them sitting there, but it's degrading to have them here.

Whatever.
it would be nice to have other page for tokens...other for banknotes...
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
Nice to put into perspective...

I really don't like tokens or medallions, so I never add them to the *TOKENS* page. I have a brass Polish "4 Dukaty" token with a link http://www.dukatlokalny.pl inscribed on the top,some cruise ship tokens and a heck of a lot of arcade tokens. I chose to not upload them because they degrade the goodness of Numista, but I do upload bank-issued tokens with KM#Tn codes.

Banknotes... no. I don't think they would fit Numista... talk to Xavier, Numista's main admin about banknotes. I have many Japanese notes, Euro notes, US notes, Mexican, Colombian, Moroccan, and Chinese, but I really don't care about them. And neither does the rest of Numista. They are not durable, and don't have a catalogue. And all those codes! Every banknote has a different code, and collecting every note in circulation means collecting every single bill. That just won't do.

Just ask Xavier. Hands down, we won't accept banknote collecting here.

Sorry, or, as I say in Japanese, gomenasai.

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

montysghost
Joined: 28-Jul-2010
Posts: 39
Well said Smart one.
Bloody nuisance those paper things eh?
I got a big lot of them in July they were in with a shipment of German coins I bought. No problem I thought a bit of net research and check if any were worth anything half an hour or so and sorted.
Wrong!!! after nearly a week I finally got through them, with much stress and hassle.
Whats all those serial numbers about then! A simple A, or B mark is much easier to sort.

Best light your cigarettes with them and get on with the real thing, you know those round metal things known as coins

All the best for Xmas everyone

Derek <:D
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
That's very sweet, montysghost,

Ah, they're ok. But they aren't really something to collect.

I see what you're saying. I would rather just spend them all. I'm not going to collect every single 10,000 yen note I have. Those damn serial numbers. If there was no serial number, I would think about keeping them. But bills loose their value, though the coin metals don't.

I'm waiting for a note collector in my neighbourhood who would exchange them for coins. I mean, there's no catalogue for them and they're delicate.

You have a good christmas, smoking bills. I'm just yanking your chain. You have a very merry christmas and new year.

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

montysghost
Joined: 28-Jul-2010
Posts: 39
And a verry merry xmas to you smart one (;0

Montys xmas tips for the paper notes.

1/ Carefully cellotape 50 or 60 together to form a big sheet of paper, about a meter square.
Wrap your xmas prezzies in them,

2/ Roll a hundred or so into very tight rolls, add an elastic/rubber band.
Throw on the fire and enjoy the energy savings on your fuel bills.

3/ take 50 bills and place in a large mixing bowl, add two tbs flour. and a little water, mix into a stiff paste.
with your hands mould the bill dough into a ball and leave to dry out.
When dry, hang in the garden on a tree branch and watch the birds eat the dough balls. Great for those winter months when bird food is scarcer then a 1945E third Reich ten pfennig piece.

4/ Take a huge wedge of bills into the town centre on a Saturday lunchtime. stand in the middle of the road outside the shopping mall and scream free cash!!! Throw them in high in the air.
Watch the looks on the crowds faces as they fight to try and grab as many as possible.
 
Monty
kommodore
Joined: 5-Nov-2009
Posts: 2764
my tip:send all the banknotes you have to me:D
i'll take good care of them:D
montysghost
Joined: 28-Jul-2010
Posts: 39
OK YOU SEND ME ALL THOSE ROUND NASTY METAL MONIES AND I WILL SWAP YOU FOR THE NOTES :P
kommodore
Joined: 5-Nov-2009
Posts: 2764
Quote: montysghostOK YOU SEND ME ALL THOSE ROUND NASTY METAL MONIES AND I WILL SWAP YOU FOR THE NOTES :P
they aren't nasty at all :love:
KennyG
Joined: 25-Apr-2010
Posts: 4553
Ah, they're not nasty.

They are for spending. There's no need to wrap a prezzy in 500 Euro bills, scortch 100 Dollar notes, feed the pidgeons 50 Pound sheets, or toss to the (hopelessly) poor 10,000 Yen cash. They are yours. But that's a pretty good way of screwing people.

I'll try that.

Hey, if anyone likes bills and has coins, and if I have the opportunity, I might trade. As an admin, I don't have many coins, almost none from Africa. None from Russia. I don't mind.

Anyone here don't celebrate christmas? I don't... much. Just the giving, and getting... and getting. Not much other chrismas crap.

Kenny

- Verifying your Asian and British-territorial coins everyday with the best quality photos and the best information.

Check out my Facebook, Kenneth Gucyski.

galsy
Joined: 7-Jan-2011
Posts: 2
Oh com'on...this is not a coin from Tibet but from a province called Szechwan nowadays in PRC! This was the only province that crafted the portrait of the second last king of the Manchurian Kingdom.
Xavier Site admin
Joined: 16-Jan-2007
Posts: 3369
"四川" is written on the coin because it was struck by the Chinese in Szechuan Province. But the coin was intended for Bhutan.

Here are more details:
Quote: Coinage in Bhutan, Nicholas Rhodes, p.108After the Chinese tried to assert their supremacy over the Government of Tibet, and the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1910, the Chinese attempted to persuade the Bhutanese to use Chinese rupees. These were silver coins, struck in Szechuan Province, to the same standard as, and using a design copied from, the British Indian rupees, but bearing the bust of the Chinese Emperor [...]. The coins were widely used in Eastern Tibet at the time, but the Bhutanese, under pressure from the British, officially refused to allow them to circulate in Bhutan. However, some of these rupees can be found in Bhutan, particularly from sources in the east, where they are also called Gormo. Whether they were used in Bhutan as early as 1910, or whether they were only imported in more recent years, is not certain. Certainly, many Chinese silver coins of various types, can be found in eastern Bhutan, and although Tibetan refugees must have brought most of them after 1950, they are accepted locally with a standard value. Most common are the dollars of Yuan Shih K'ai, some of which were struck in the mid-1950's specifically for use in Tibet, and in both Tibet and Bhutan they are known as Da-yuan.
Source : http://himalaya.socanth.cam.ac.uk/collections/journals/jbs/pdf/JBS_01_01_04.pdf
galsy
Joined: 7-Jan-2011
Posts: 2
I am so glad to receive reply from Xavier. I respect Mr Rhodes but there are few issues worth discussing:

1. This silver rupee was struck in the years 1906~1908 when the Imperial Kingdom of Tsing was militarily so weak and corrupted that the government officials was too busy and exhausted in resisting invasions from western military powers and Japanese along the eastern coast. How could China at that time assert their supremacy over the Government of Tibet? Some comments would say that it was a design copied from the British Indian rupees but for the sake of buttering up the king. Trading in-between these areas helped in circulating this coin westwards but the Chinese in Szechwan area preferred this set of rupee though Tibetan and Bhutanese tender did exist.
2. Silver dollars of Yuan Shih K'ai was last struck in 1921 and Yuan himself died in June 6, 1916. Yuan's coins were virtually not possible to be struck in mid-1950s. Not even Mao's portrait existed on Chinese tender at that time.
3. Tibet had their own set of silver coins crafted in Tibetan. Tibet had local tenders even after the communists took over the reign of China.
4. Dalai Lama fled to India on March 30, 1959. Remember Dalai Lama and Panchen Lama once meet Mao Zedong together in 1955.

That is why I prefer to regard this rupee as "Szechwan" origin.
Matt Probert
Joined: 13-Feb-2011
Posts: 631
"It's interesting to notice that these coins were sometimes cut into 2 or 4 parts for use as small change. "

Just out of curiosity, this was common practice in England in the past. English coins were originally made from that value of gold or silver, so to cut it up made perfect sense, one silver penny was really one penny's worth of silver, cut in half and you had two half pennies each of half a penny's worth of silver etc etc.

people also used to shave or clip bits off coins, collect them up and melt them down into ingots of precious metal - a highly illegal practice, as the coin no longer contained the full value of silver or gold.
uthouston
Joined: 13-Mar-2011
Posts: 2
who is the site administrator? The Irish shilling 1939-1942 is listed a copper-nickel and should be .750 silver.

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